Clear

Winnipeg, MB

19°c Clear

Full Forecast

Olympics

Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Rough sledding for Olympic champion : Manitoba's Montgomery on thin ice

Make no bones about it: skeleton's darling in tough to return to Games

Posted: 12/19/2013 1:00 AM | Comments: 0

Advertisement

  • Print
Named to the Canadian Olympic skeleton team Wednesday were: Sarah Reid  (clockwise from left), Eric Neilson, John Fairbairn and Mellisa Hollingsworth.

JEFF MCINTOSH / THE CANADIAN PRESS Enlarge Image

Named to the Canadian Olympic skeleton team Wednesday were: Sarah Reid (clockwise from left), Eric Neilson, John Fairbairn and Mellisa Hollingsworth.

CALGARY -- The man who gave the host country one of its most memorable moments of the 2010 Winter Olympics faces long odds to compete at the next Winter Games.

Jon Montgomery's gold medal in skeleton at the Whistler Sliding Centre and his subsequent auctioning off of a pitcher of beer in the village square elevated him to folk-hero status.

But the 34-year-old from Russell, Man., might not make the 2014 team for Sochi, Russia, in February.

Montgomery's results the last season and a half have yet to meet Bobsleigh Canada Skeleton's qualification criteria. He needs to hit the ball out of the park and also have a little luck in the four races he has left to qualify before Jan. 19.

"Unfortunately for me, I'm fighting an uphill battle in that regard," Montgomery said Wednesday in Calgary. "I would guess the way things have gone it would be nothing short of winning the four races before that deadline."

Mellisa Hollingsworth of Eckville, Alta., Calgary's Sarah Reid and John Fairbairn and Eric Neilson of Kelowna, B.C., were introduced Wednesday as Canada's skeleton athletes for Sochi.

Canada can qualify a third man and a third woman for Sochi in January, according to head coach Duff Gibson.

Should Canada gain those berths, Montgomery is up against Dave Greszczyszyn of Burlington, Ont., for the final spot on the men's team. It will come down to points earned in races.

Greszczyszyn is currently ranked 23rd in the world and Montgomery 25th with 32 points separating them.

Montgomery didn't qualify in fall selection races for the World Cup team. He's competing on the secondary Intercontinental Cup circuit where results are worth fewer points than World Cup results.

Greszczyszyn will continue to race World Cups.

Montgomery will race twice in Whistler, B.C., on the track of his Olympic triumph before a pair of races in Park City, Utah, in January.

"I'm always optimistic," he said. "I'll work until the cows come home for any kind of a chance. I'm not going to worry about the race results before they happen.

"I'm going to be worried about the next run, the next inch, the next corner. If I get ahead of that, I'm not focused on what's important, which is the things I can control right now.

"I won't be defined by my failures and this is hardly a failure yet."

Montgomery has yet to bond with the sled he built from scratch when he took the 2011-12 season off from racing.

Unwilling to race on a sled that got him wins on just one track in the world and looking ahead to Sochi, Montgomery worked with the metal construction company Standen's on a new sled.

The move hasn't translated into success on the track. Montgomery doesn't regret the season he took off or the move to a new sled.

He's sure there would be no chance of beating Latvian skeleton superstar Martin Dukars or Russian slider Alexander Tretiakov, who are co-favourites for gold in Sochi, if he didn't make the change.

"The sled that I've got right now is better than the sled I used to be on," Montgomery said. "There's no question. The only unfortunate part, and the reason why I was so successful in 2010, was because that old sled was like an extension of my body... I'm not there with my Standen sled. I haven't had the time to get comfortable with it yet."

And it's not a simple matter of going back to his former sled, he says. Montgomery hasn't been on it for three years and his body would have to re-learn it. There isn't time for equipment tinkering now.

Montgomery took the risks he did because he wanted another Olympic medal.

"I was searching for that special thing I knew I would have to do to be a medallist this go around," Montgomery explained. "I've got no interest in becoming a two-time Olympian. My interest was always I wanted to do everything in my power to go there and defend my Olympic gold medal, our Olympic gold medal.

"I've got zero regrets. I know I created the bed I'm sleeping in, but I'm only disappointed. Disappointed is fleeting. Regret is lasting."

 

-- The Canadian Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition December 19, 2013 D3

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories? Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.