The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Cricket rising: Immigrants fueling resurgence of the game in the United States

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EAST ISLIP, N.Y. - It may not be threatening baseball as America's favourite bat and ball game, but cricket is enjoying a surge of popularity in the United States with the debut of a national league and higher demand to build pitches across the country.

Areas such as New York City, California's Silicon Valley, Washington, D.C., and Dallas have become cricket hotbeds, fueled by an influx of mostly South Asian immigrants, some of whom arrived as part of the high-tech boom.

In the immigrant-rich New York area, cricket has become so popular that lotteries are being held for the chance to play on pitches at some state parks.

New York City schools still have the only school cricket league in the country, but it has doubled in size in just seven years, with 30 teams now competing for the limited-overs title.

A national travelling league, the American Cricket Champions League, began this year and has 17 teams from Boston to Los Angeles vying a for a six-team playoff tournament.

For 17-year-old Akash Chowdhury, who arrived in New York City four years ago from Bangladesh and plays in the city schools league, cricket has helped smooth the transition to his new home.

His Brooklyn International High School team, outfitted with crisp, white uniforms and batting helmets like the stars they follow on cable television, often play their games in the outfields of idle baseball diamonds.

"Playing cricket in America helps me remember my back country," Chowdhury said. "But I really don't miss it like that, because I can play here."

In the past several years, communities in states from Maryland to Indiana have taken initiatives to organize youth leagues and build cricket facilities. The United States Youth Cricket Association has donated 1,500 sets of cricket equipment — bats, balls and wickets — to community youth programs around the country.

"We're hoping that as kids grow up, they will create pressure on school systems to think of cricket," said Jamie Harrison, CEO of the American Cricket Federation.

Cricket is wildly popular in former countries of the British Empire.

John Aaron, executive secretary of the American Cricket Federation, grew up playing the game in his native Guyana. He compares cricket in the U.S. to where football was just a few decades ago.

"When soccer first started here, people said it's not going to go anywhere — American football is the thing," Aaron said. "Soccer has not replaced American football, but it has certainly taken off now, hasn't it? It's attracting international teams coming here to play. Cricket can do the same thing."

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Associated Press video journalist David Martin contributed to this report.

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