Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Bale could become world's best-paid footballer

  • Print

LONDON -- Just four years ago Gareth Bale was considered a jinx and a flop, and faced being off-loaded on the cheap by Tottenham.

Failing to live up to expectations, the disillusioned, gangly teenager endured more than 1,500 minutes on the pitch across 28 months before finally featuring on a winning side in the Premier League for Tottenham.

Fast-forward to 2013 and the now-muscular, speedy 24-year-old Bale is one of European football's most potent attacking forces and the most sought-after asset in the summer transfer window. He could also be on the verge of becoming the world's most expensive footballer.

Real Madrid appears to be leading the chase for Bale, who would be emulating Cristiano Ronaldo and David Beckham in leaving the Premier League to become the Spanish club's latest Galactico.

"Real Madrid's fans will be purring at the thought of having possibly him and Ronaldo in the same team," said former Tottenham player and manager Glenn Hoddle. "They can go back and challenge the world again."

To prize Bale away from north London, however, Madrid is likely to have to improve on the world-record fee of 93.9 million euros (then $131 million) it paid Manchester United for Ronaldo in 2009.

British and Spanish media have reported that Madrid has offered 100 million euros for Bale, although neither Tottenham nor Madrid has publicly commented on the bid.

Although Tottenham's public posturing has seen a "not for sale" sign officially left dangling over Bale during the summer, it would be hard for the north London club to reject such a hefty wad of cash and retain a player agitating to join a team challenging for top titles.

Because, for all the mesmerizing footwork on the ball, eye-catching goals from free kicks and defence-splitting surges, Bale doesn't have a single winners' medal for show for his six years at Tottenham.

Bale, who has not commented on the speculation, reported to training as usual at Tottenham on Wednesday.

Former Tottenham player and manager Glenn Hoddle is among the many current and past players hoping Bale will be staying with Spurs for one more season.

"I just sense that maybe he might go for the wrong reasons," said Hoddle. "If he wants to go just for football reasons I think it might be better in a year's time or maybe two years' time."

It was in May 2007 that Tottenham paid just 5 million pounds (then $8 million) to bring the 17-year-old Bale from Southampton, the south-coast club then playing in the second tier.

Although he scored three times in his first four starts, a series of injuries stymied his progress and he went on that frustrating run, becoming a symbol of poor results until emerging as a substitute 84 minutes into his 25th Premier League game -- a 5-0 rout of Burnley.

Since then, Bale has never looked back. Neither has Tottenham, which at one point was reported to have tried to use Bale as a make-weight in deals to bring in new players.

After shaking off his substitute's role in January 2010, Bale began to consistently show the flair and pace that displaced left back Benoit Assou-Ekotto from the starting lineup. And, as the attacking side of Bale's game began to flourish, then-manager Harry Reddknapp pushed Bale onto the left wing.

 

-- The Associated Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 1, 2013 D4

History

Updated on Thursday, August 1, 2013 at 8:48 AM CDT: Removes extra text

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.