The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Philosophical Petkovic back into last 8 of Grand Slam again after battling back from injury

  • Print

PARIS - Andrea Petkovic had plenty to be philosophical about when she considered retiring from tennis after a succession of injuries saw her drop out of the top 10 and plummet to 143rd.

Fast forward 18 months, the 26-year-old German is into a Grand Slam quarterfinal again after beating unseeded Kiki Bertens 1-6, 6-2, 7-5 at the French Open on Monday.

It's her first quarterfinal at a major since she reached the last eight at the U.S. Open in 2011. Petkovic also reached the quarters at the Australian Open and French Open that year, achieving a career-high ranking of No. 9.

Then it all started to go wrong. Injuries to her back, ankle and knee took their toll, and by the end of 2012 she was ranked 143rd and missed five of the eight Grand Slams in 2012 and 2013.

With her career turning into a nightmare, she started looking elsewhere.

"I asked for some internships at newspapers," said Petkovic, seeded 28th at Roland Garros. "I was also writing for kind of a big newspaper in Germany for a while, and I asked a few politicians that I know if I could do an internship with them."

Although her career is back on track, she has taken classes in political science, philosophy and literature. So she knows what to do when she's in a philosophical mood: pick up a book.

Petkovic considers Johann Wolfgang von Goethe "our greatest genius with words" and admires the works of Friedrich Nietzsche.

"Philosophy-wise, Nietzsche is the one that impressed me most. I don't necessarily agree with everything he says and it's very dark and sad, but he was a good writer," she said. "I actually really liked the existentialists in French. I read a lot of (Jean-Paul) Sartre and (Albert) Camus."

Although she loves learning, Petkovic has ruled out a future career in teaching.

"I would love to be able to do that, but I have no patience whatsoever," she said.

Petkovic had plenty of time to think in the early days of her career when she would travel on her own and stay in cheap places.

"That was a good lesson of life being in all these little villages," she said. "It made me tougher."

One memory stands out.

"Once, when I played in England, the hotels were so expensive and I had just finished school. I stayed at a hostel and next to me were 25 boys celebrating something," she said. "They kept singing English songs for the whole night. And I had to play next day at 10 in the morning. ... Well, I lost."

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

O'Shea says the team is going to stick to the plan after first loss

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker hangs out on a birch tree in St. Vital. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is considered a keystone species. Other species take advantage of the holes that the birds make in trees. A group of sapsuckers are collectively known as a
  • PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS 070619 LIGHTNING ILLUMINATES AN ABANDONED GRAIN ELEVATOR IN THE VILLAGE OF SANFORD ABOUT 10PM TUESDAY NIGHT AS A LINE OF THUNDERSTORMS PASSED NEAR WINNIPEG JUST TO THE NORTH OF THIS  SITE.

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Who are the real Bombers?

View Results

Ads by Google