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Anchor pulled from Puget Sound might be from 1792 expedition by British explorer Vancouver

Posted: 06/10/2014 4:21 PM | Comments: 0

Last Modified: 06/10/2014 6:44 PM

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Work crews pull out an anchor from Admiralty Inlet off Whidbey Island, Wash., on Monday, June 9, 2014. The anchor was found six years ago by sea-cucumber diver Doug Monk who formed Anchor Ventures with amateur historian Scott Grimm to bring it to the surface. The anchor may be the anchor lost by the HMS Chatham as it explored with Capt. George Vancouver's HMS Discovery in 1792. The 900-pound anchor was taken Monday to the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend. (AP Photo/The Seattle Times, Steve Ringman) SEATTLE OUT; USA TODAY OUT; MAGS OUT; TELEVISION OUT; NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT TO BOTH THE SEATTLE TIMES AND THE PHOTOGRAPHER

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Work crews pull out an anchor from Admiralty Inlet off Whidbey Island, Wash., on Monday, June 9, 2014. The anchor was found six years ago by sea-cucumber diver Doug Monk who formed Anchor Ventures with amateur historian Scott Grimm to bring it to the surface. The anchor may be the anchor lost by the HMS Chatham as it explored with Capt. George Vancouver's HMS Discovery in 1792. The 900-pound anchor was taken Monday to the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend. (AP Photo/The Seattle Times, Steve Ringman) SEATTLE OUT; USA TODAY OUT; MAGS OUT; TELEVISION OUT; NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT TO BOTH THE SEATTLE TIMES AND THE PHOTOGRAPHER

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash. - Experts will examine an anchor recovered from Puget Sound north of Seattle to determine if it was from one of the earliest ships to explore Northwest waters.

The anchor was found six years ago by sea-cucumber diver Doug Monk, who formed Anchor Ventures with amateur historian Scott Grimm to bring it to the surface. It was in Admiralty Inlet off Whidbey Island.

The Seattle Times and the Peninsula Daily News report the 900-pound anchor might be the one lost by the HMS Chatham, a Royal Navy survey brig. The ship accompanied the HMS Discovery as British explorer George Vancouver's charted the West Coast in 1792.

The anchor was taken Monday to the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend. It will be prepared for shipping to Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, where experts will try to determine whether it's really the anchor lost 222 years ago.

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