The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Kilt ban voted down by Catholic school board trustees in Durham Region

  • Print

OSHAWA, Ont. - Kilts will still be part of the dress code for girls at Catholic high schools in a district east of Toronto — at least for now.

A kilt controversy had been broiling at the Durham Region Catholic School Board as trustees considered taking steps to eliminate that part of the girls' uniforms.

Trustee Chris Leahy put forward a motion to discuss banning the kilts in response to complaints about rising hemlines on some students, but the board voted it down Monday night.

The chairman of the board of trustees says there is already a policy of appropriate dress in the schools and it is reviewable every three years.

Jim McCafferty says a trustee who wants to open the kilts issue for review could follow that process, which involves consultations with school councils, parents and students.

About 4,500 female students would be affected if the school district eliminated kilts in favour of pants.

But McCafferty said the students — teens in Grades 9 to 12 — know what the dress code is and the rules are made clear in their student handbooks.

"We realize that the girls do wear their kilts a little high, but they know what the proper length is and the principals and vice-principals in the high school police it," he said Tuesday.

"If they wear the kilt too high and the principal notices it, then the principal will point that out to the student and if it continues then the student will be sent home with a note to the parent and it goes from there."

"The parents and the students know what the proper length of the kilt is supposed to be, so if they hike it up then they suffer the consequences," he added.

Leahy said Tuesday he fully supports the board's decision.

"There is a possibility that we can look at adjusting this policy in the future at some time," added Leahy, who chairs the board's policy committee.

Leahy had said the kilts were getting shorter and shorter, as girls were rolling them down from the waist. School administrators were spending too much time enforcing the length of kilts when they could be focusing on education, he said.

McCafferty said any policy review process would take months, or even longer.

Other Catholic boards, including those in Toronto, Halton, Peterborough and Clarington, have taken measures to give schools the power to ban kilts.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Lindor Reynolds speaks candidly about life with terminal cancer

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker hangs out on a birch tree in St. Vital. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is considered a keystone species. Other species take advantage of the holes that the birds make in trees. A group of sapsuckers are collectively known as a
  • JOE.BRYKSA@FREEPRESS.MB.CA Local-(Standup photo)- Humming Around- A female ruby -throated hummingbird fly's through the bee bomb  flowers Friday at the Assiniboine Park English Garden- Nectar from flowers are their main source of food. Hummingbirds wings can beat as fast as 75x times second. Better get a glimpse of them soon the birds fly far south for the winter - from Mexico to South America- JOE BRYKSA/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS- Sept 10, 2009

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Who will you vote for in Wednesday's mayoral race?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google