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Egypt's president given last-chance ultimatum

Morsi reviewing military's 48-hour deadline to resign

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A protester waves a national flag on a roof in Tahrir Square during a demonstration against Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo Monday.

MANU BRABO / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge Image

A protester waves a national flag on a roof in Tahrir Square during a demonstration against Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo Monday.

CAIRO, Egypt -- Egypt's military issued a "last-chance" ultimatum Monday to President Mohammed Morsi, giving him 48 hours to meet the demands of millions of protesters in the streets seeking the ouster of the Islamist leader or the generals will impose their own plan for the country.

The military's statement, read on state TV, put enormous pressure on Morsi to step down and sent giant crowds opposing the president in Cairo and other cities into delirious celebrations of singing, dancing and fireworks. But the ultimatum raised worries on both sides the military could outright take over, as it did after the 2011 ouster of autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

It also raised the risk of a backlash from Morsi's Islamist backers, including his powerful Muslim Brotherhood and hard-liners, some of whom once belonged to armed militant groups. Already, they vowed to resist what they depicted as a threat of a coup against a legitimately elected president.

Pro-Morsi marches numbering in the several thousands began after nightfall in a string of cities around the country, sparking clashes. An alliance of the Brotherhood and Islamists read a statement at a televised conference calling on people to rally to prevent "any attempt to overturn" Morsi's election.

"Any coup of any kind against legitimacy will only pass over our dead bodies," one leading Brotherhood figure, Mohammed el-Beltagi, told a rally by thousands of Islamists outside a mosque near the Ittihadiya presidential palace.

A line of around 1,500 men with shields, helmets and sticks -- assigned with protecting the rally -- stamped their feet in military-like lines, singing, "Stomp our feet, raise a fire. Islam's march is coming."

After midnight, Morsi's office issued a statement saying a "modern democratic state" was one of the main achievements of the anti-Mubarak revolution, adding, "With all its force, Egypt will not allow itself to be taken backward." It said Morsi was still reviewing the military's statement, but added some parts of it "could cause disturbances in the complicated national scene."

U.S. President Barack Obama said the U.S. is committed to democracy in Egypt, not any particular leader. Traveling in Tanzania, Obama said although Morsi was democratically elected, the government must respect its opposition and minority groups.

Army troops near the pro-Morsi rally searched cars for weapons.

In the second day straight day of anti-Morsi protests nationwide, men and women danced outside the Ittihadiya palace, some cried with joy and bands on a stage played revolutionary songs after the military's statement.

But the army's stance also raises an unsettling prospect for many of them as well. Many expressed worries of an army takeover. During the time the generals were in power, many of those now in the anti-Morsi campaign led demonstrations against military rule, angered by its management of the transition and heavy hand in the killing of protesters.

"Morsi will leave, but I'm concerned with the plan afterward. The military should be a tool to pressure, but we had a bitter experience with military ruling the country, and we don't want to repeat it," said Roshdy Khairy, a 24-year-old doctor among the throngs in Tahrir Square.

-- The Associated Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition July 2, 2013 A11

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