June 29, 2017

cloudy

Winnipeg
17° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

58 people confirmed or presumed dead from London tower fire

London police on Saturday raised to 58 the number of deaths either confirmed or presumed following the horrific inferno that turned the city's Grenfell Tower public housing block into a charred hulk.

Public anger is mounting as residents and neighbours demand answers for how the blaze early Wednesday spread so quickly and trapped so many of the tower's 600-odd residents. British media have reported that contractors installed a cheaper, less flame-resistant type of exterior paneling on the 24-story tower in a renovation that was completed just last year.

A woman touches a missing poster for 12-year-old Jessica Urbano on a tribute wall after laying flowers on the side of Latymer Community Church next to the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

A woman touches a missing poster for 12-year-old Jessica Urbano on a tribute wall after laying flowers on the side of Latymer Community Church next to the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Executive Director of Kensington and Chelsea Council Sue Harris, left, shows Queen Elizabeth II donations of aid made by members of the local community during a visit to the Westway Sports Centre which is providing temporary shelter for those who have been made homeless by the fire at Grenfell Tower, in London, Friday June 16, 2017. Relatives of those missing after a high-rise tower blaze in London are searching frantically for their loved ones, as the police commander in charge of the investigation says he hopes the death toll will not rise to three figures. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool Photo via AP)

Executive Director of Kensington and Chelsea Council Sue Harris, left, shows Queen Elizabeth II donations of aid made by members of the local community during a visit to the Westway Sports Centre which is providing temporary shelter for those who have been made homeless by the fire at Grenfell Tower, in London, Friday June 16, 2017. Relatives of those missing after a high-rise tower blaze in London are searching frantically for their loved ones, as the police commander in charge of the investigation says he hopes the death toll will not rise to three figures. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool Photo via AP)

Emergency workers wheel away a body from the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (Rick Findler/PA via AP)

Emergency workers wheel away a body from the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (Rick Findler/PA via AP)

Emergency workers search debris that fell at the base of the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Emergency workers search debris that fell at the base of the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Emergency workers wheel away a body from the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (Rick Findler/PA via AP)

Emergency workers wheel away a body from the fire-gutted Grenfell Tower in London, Friday, June 16, 2017, after a fire engulfed the 24-story building Wednesday morning. London firefighters combed through the burned-out public housing tower Thursday in a grim search for missing people as police and the prime minister launched investigations into the deadly inferno, with pressure building on officials to explain the disaster and assure that similar buildings around the country are safe. (Rick Findler/PA via AP)

A Friday prayer service is held at the Al-Manar mosque near Grenfell Tower in London, Friday June 16, 2017. A massive fire raced through the 24-storey high-rise apartment building in west London early Wednesday, and London fire commissioner says it will take weeks for the building to be searched and 'cleared'. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

A Friday prayer service is held at the Al-Manar mosque near Grenfell Tower in London, Friday June 16, 2017. A massive fire raced through the 24-storey high-rise apartment building in west London early Wednesday, and London fire commissioner says it will take weeks for the building to be searched and 'cleared'. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

People write messages on a wall for the victims and in support for those affected by the massive fire in Grenfell Tower, in London, Thursday, June 15, 2017. A massive fire raced through the 24-story high-rise apartment building in west London early Wednesday. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

People write messages on a wall for the victims and in support for those affected by the massive fire in Grenfell Tower, in London, Thursday, June 15, 2017. A massive fire raced through the 24-story high-rise apartment building in west London early Wednesday. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

People watch from a balcony as people walk during a demonstration following the fire at Grenfell Towers that engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, in London, Friday June 16, 2017. Grief over a London high-rise tower fire that killed dozens turned to outrage Friday amid reports that the materials used in a recent renovation of the public housing block may have fueled the inferno. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

People watch from a balcony as people walk during a demonstration following the fire at Grenfell Towers that engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, in London, Friday June 16, 2017. Grief over a London high-rise tower fire that killed dozens turned to outrage Friday amid reports that the materials used in a recent renovation of the public housing block may have fueled the inferno. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

Protesters stand in the lobby of Kensington town hall in west London, the headquarters of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, demanding answers over the Grenfell Tower fire, in London, Friday June 16, 2017. Grief over a London high-rise tower fire that killed dozens turned to outrage Friday amid reports that the materials used in a recent renovation of the public housing block may have fueled the inferno. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

Protesters stand in the lobby of Kensington town hall in west London, the headquarters of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, demanding answers over the Grenfell Tower fire, in London, Friday June 16, 2017. Grief over a London high-rise tower fire that killed dozens turned to outrage Friday amid reports that the materials used in a recent renovation of the public housing block may have fueled the inferno. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

Grenfell Tower in west London after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Public fury over the London high-rise fire is mounting as exhausted London firefighters continue their grim search Saturday for victims of the inferno that killed at least 30 people. (David Mirzoeff/PA via AP)

Grenfell Tower in west London after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Public fury over the London high-rise fire is mounting as exhausted London firefighters continue their grim search Saturday for victims of the inferno that killed at least 30 people. (David Mirzoeff/PA via AP)

Tube staff members stand outside the closed Latimer Road Station, near to the Grenfell Tower where a fire engulfed the 24 storey building, in west London, Saturday June 17, 2017. London's fire department says the reason for the subway closure near the high-rise disaster is because of a "short-term risk of some debris falling onto the tracks." (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)

Tube staff members stand outside the closed Latimer Road Station, near to the Grenfell Tower where a fire engulfed the 24 storey building, in west London, Saturday June 17, 2017. London's fire department says the reason for the subway closure near the high-rise disaster is because of a "short-term risk of some debris falling onto the tracks." (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)

Urban Search and Rescue officers from London Fire Brigade inside the Grenfell Tower in west London after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Public fury over the London high-rise fire is mounting as exhausted London firefighters continue their grim search Saturday for victims of the inferno that killed at least 30 people. (David Mirzoeff/PA via AP)

Urban Search and Rescue officers from London Fire Brigade inside the Grenfell Tower in west London after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Public fury over the London high-rise fire is mounting as exhausted London firefighters continue their grim search Saturday for victims of the inferno that killed at least 30 people. (David Mirzoeff/PA via AP)

Grenfell Tower in west London after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Public fury over the London high-rise fire is mounting as exhausted London firefighters continue their grim search Saturday for victims of the inferno that killed at least 30 people. (David Mirzoeff/PA via AP)

Grenfell Tower in west London after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building on Wednesday morning, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Public fury over the London high-rise fire is mounting as exhausted London firefighters continue their grim search Saturday for victims of the inferno that killed at least 30 people. (David Mirzoeff/PA via AP)

Victims, volunteers and community leaders from the Grenfell Tower fire pause on the steps outside 10 Downing Street following a meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May, after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building, in London, Saturday June 17, 2017. The meeting comes a day after May was heckled during a visit to the west London neighborhood where Wednesday’s inferno took place. At least 30 people have been killed, hundreds of others have been left homeless and dozens of others are missing. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

Victims, volunteers and community leaders from the Grenfell Tower fire pause on the steps outside 10 Downing Street following a meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May, after a fire engulfed the 24-storey building, in London, Saturday June 17, 2017. The meeting comes a day after May was heckled during a visit to the west London neighborhood where Wednesday’s inferno took place. At least 30 people have been killed, hundreds of others have been left homeless and dozens of others are missing. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

A woman looks towards missing posters stuck on a phone box in front of the remains of Grenfell Tower in London, Saturday, June 17, 2017. ÔªøÔªøPolice Commander Stuart Cundy said Saturday it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead in the public housing block that was devastated by a fire early Wednesday. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

A woman looks towards missing posters stuck on a phone box in front of the remains of Grenfell Tower in London, Saturday, June 17, 2017. ÔªøÔªøPolice Commander Stuart Cundy said Saturday it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead in the public housing block that was devastated by a fire early Wednesday. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Posters of people missing are stuck to a lamp post near Grenfell Tower in London, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Police Commander Stuart Cundy said Saturday it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead in the public housing block that was devastated by a fire early Wednesday. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Posters of people missing are stuck to a lamp post near Grenfell Tower in London, Saturday, June 17, 2017. Police Commander Stuart Cundy said Saturday it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead in the public housing block that was devastated by a fire early Wednesday. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Police Commander Stuart Cundy said the number of 58 is based on reports from the public and may rise. It includes 30 deaths that already have been confirmed, and reports of people who are missing and presumed to have been killed. He says it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead at the building.

"Sadly, at this time there are 58 people who we have been told were in the Grenfell Tower on the night that are missing. And therefore, sadly, I have to assume that they are dead," he said.

He said police would consider criminal prosecutions if there is evidence of wrongdoing and that the police investigation would include scrutiny of the renovation project at the tower, which experts believe may have left the building more vulnerable to a catastrophic blaze.

Police have been struggling to come up with an authoritative list of who was in the building when the fire started, making it difficult to determine how many had died.

Cundy said there may have been other people in the tower who police are not aware of, and that could increase the death toll. He asked anyone who was in the tower and survived to contact police immediately.

Police say the harrowing search for remains had paused Friday because of safety concerns at the blackened tower but has resumed. Cundy said emergency workers have now reached the top of the building.

British Prime Minister Theresa May, facing criticism for the government's handling of the disaster, met Saturday with 15 fire survivors invited to her official residence at 10 Downing Street. The group left after a meeting that lasted more than two hours but did not speak to reporters gathered outside.

The meeting is unlikely to quell complaints that May has been slow to reach out to fire survivors, despite her announcement of a $6.4 million emergency fund to help the displaced families.

May said after the meeting Saturday that there have been "huge frustrations" in the community as people tried to get information.

"Frankly, the support on the ground for families who needed help or basic information in the initial hours after this appalling disaster was not good enough," she said.

The identification of the victims is proving very difficult — which experts attribute to the extreme heat of the fire. British health authorities say that 19 fire survivors are still being treated at London hospitals, and 10 of them remain in critical condition.

Police said they are using the INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification Standards to identify the deceased. This relies on dental records, fingerprints and DNA when possible and also features like tattoos or scars.

The tragedy cast a pall on the Trooping the Color festivities that mark the official birthday of Queen Elizabeth II. A solemn Elizabeth and her husband Prince Philip held a minute of silence for the fire victims at the start of the procession Saturday.

The 91-year-old monarch said that Britain remains "resolute in the face of adversity" after the horrendous fire and recent extremist attacks in London and Manchester. The queen said it was "difficult to escape a very sombre mood" on what is normally a day of celebration.

There is simmering anger in the multi-ethnic north Kensington area hit by the blaze, and public fury has been directed at senior government figures, including May, who was jeered Friday after she visited. Hundreds have been left homeless, putting more pressure on officials in a city plagued by a chronic housing shortage.

Scuffles broke out near the Kensington and Chelsea town hall offices Friday as demonstrators chanting "We want justice!" surged toward the doors.

The government has promised a full public inquiry, but that has done little to ease a sense of frustration at the lack of information about how the fire moved so quickly to engulf the building.

Engineering experts and fire safety specialists believe the building's exterior cladding may have quickly fueled the blaze, overwhelming fire protection devices. British officials have ordered a review of other buildings that have had similar renovations.

The tragedy has provoked a huge response from nearby communities. More than 3 million pounds ($3.8 million) have been raised for the victims. Many of the displaced are living in churches and community centres. There is ample food and water but very little privacy or proper bedding, and with the tower destroyed, no one knows where they will be relocated or for how long.

Two nearby Underground subway lines were partially shut down Saturday in the fire area to make sure that debris from the tower did not land on the tracks.

Some Grenfell residents had warned months ago that fire safety issues at the tower left it at risk of a "catastrophic" event. They say their complaints were ignored — and fear it was because the tower was full of poor people in a predominantly wealthy borough.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.

Photo Store

Scroll down to load more

Top