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Marine spokesman: No injuries after jet crashes into row of houses in California desert

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This photo shows the site of a military jet that crashed on a residential street in the desert community of Imperial, Calif., setting two homes on fire Wednesday, June 4, 2014. Lance Cpl. Christopher Johns, a U.S. Marines spokesman, says the jet was a Harrier from Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (AP Photo/The Imperial Valley Press, Chelcey Adami)

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This photo shows the site of a military jet that crashed on a residential street in the desert community of Imperial, Calif., setting two homes on fire Wednesday, June 4, 2014. Lance Cpl. Christopher Johns, a U.S. Marines spokesman, says the jet was a Harrier from Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (AP Photo/The Imperial Valley Press, Chelcey Adami)

IMPERIAL, Calif. - A Marine jet crashed into a residential area and destroyed two homes in a Southern California desert community Wednesday, but no one was injured, authorities said.

Despite the explosive crash on a street of tightly packed houses, 1st Lt. Jose Negrete (neh-GREH-tay) said no people on the ground were hurt. The pilot had ejected safely, was taken to a hospital for evaluation and released, officials said.

The Harrier AV-8B went down in a front yard at 4:20 p.m. PDT in Imperial, a city of about 15,000 near the U.S.-Mexico border about 90 miles east of San Diego.

Debris from the plane hit the roof of one of the houses, which was destroyed, Marine Lt Col John Ferguson said. The subsequent explosion and fire destroyed another house and badly damaged one more.

The house that suffered the brunt of the damage had a missing roof but still had walls and windows intact.

Christopher Garcia, 11, was watching television two blocks away with his father and brother when he heard an explosion that "felt like an earthquake." He hurried outside to see a pilot parachuting into a field about 200 yards from the crash.

"A mushroom cloud of black and red smoke" rose above the house with the collapsed roof, he said. The garage of the house next door was on fire.

He saw a woman crying outside saying, "That's my house!"

Adriana Ramos, 45, whose home is less than a block from the crash, said her "whole house moved."

"It felt like a bomb was thrown in the backyard," Ramos said.

Ramos fled with her 4-year-old granddaughter and 10-year-old daughter, who both cried at the sight outside.

Another witness, Jose Santos, was driving nearby and saw the plane flying "really low." Then "it just fell down," he said.

Santos sped toward the crash site. On the way, he saw the pilot on the ground.

"He didn't look like he was injured. He was rolling from side to side," and a police officer and others were helping him, Santos said.

At the crash site, there was chaos as people ran in every direction, he said. The two homes were on fire and it was unclear if anyone was inside.

The plane was from Marine Corps Air Station Yuma in Arizona, said Cpl. Melissa Lee, a spokeswoman for Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. She had no details about what might have caused the accident.

This was the second crash in a month of a Harrier jet from the Yuma air base.

On May 9, a pilot was able to eject safely before his jet crashed in a remote desert area near the Gila River Indian Community, south of Phoenix. No one was injured.

And in July, 2012 another AV-8B Harrier crashed in an unpopulated area 15 miles from the air base, which is among the busiest in the world for the Marine Corps, and is used it to train military aviators from around the nation.

___

Hamilton reported from Los Angeles. Associated Press writer Bob Jablon also contributed to this report from Los Angeles.

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