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More men think texting while driving OK: study

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LOS ANGELES -- Do you think it's OK to text and drive because you're a great driver? If so, chances are you're a guy.

A new study published in the International Journal of Sustainable Strategic Management found four out of five college students texted while driving, and that males in particular were more likely to downplay the dangers of distracted driving because they believed they were skilled drivers.

"While male respondents widely agree that texting while driving is dangerous, they also believe that they are better at texting while driving than other drivers," wrote study authors Garold Lantz and Sandra Loeb.

The authors, who are marketing professors at Kings College, in Wilkes Barre, Pa., surveyed 120 male and female students on their texting habits as well as their views of the practice.

The purpose of the study was to determine whether there was a connection between a person's impulsiveness and their likelihood of texting while driving. The authors were surprised by what they found.

On average, the students sent 82 text messages a day, with females sending more and males sending fewer, on average. Females appeared to be more impulsive about texting, but that did not carry over to texting while driving, authors said.

"Females who were more impulsive were not more likely to text while driving," they wrote. "This is probably due to the finding that females recognized the dangerousness of texting while driving more than males."

Males, according to the study authors, reported texting less frequently and less impulsively, but "showed less awareness (or less appreciation) of the dangerousness of texting while driving."

Despite that difference in attitude, males and females appeared equally likely to text while driving in general, the authors wrote.

Previous studies have demonstrated texting while driving can slow reaction times even more than drinking and driving.

And while most people believe they are good at multitasking, other studies suggest fewer than three per cent of the population can effectively perform more than one task at a time.

Study authors noted their research was limited by the small sample size. However, they said it was among the first papers to try identifying the motivations for texting while driving.

-- Los Angeles Times

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition October 13, 2013 A3

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