Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Mourners share hugs for beloved Soprano

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NEW YORK -- The funeral for James Gandolfini took place in one of the largest churches in the world and didn't stint on ceremony.

Still, the estimated 1,500 mourners who gathered Thursday in New York's Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine seemed part of an intimate affair. They came to pay their respects to a plain but complex man whose sudden death eight days before had left all of them feeling a loss.

During the service, Gandolfini was remembered by the creator of The Sopranos as an actor who had brought a key element to mob boss Tony Soprano: Tony's inner childlike quality.

For a man who, in so many ways, was an unrepentant brute, that underlying purity was what gave viewers permission to love him.

"You brought ALL of that to it," said David Chase in remarks he delivered as if an open letter to his fallen friend and Sopranos star.

Even though Gandolfini was indisputably a formidable man both on and off the screen, Chase also saw him as a boy -- "sad, amazed, confused and loving," he summed up, addressing his subject: "You could see it in your eyes. And that's why you are a great actor."

Susan Aston, who for decades was Gandolfini's dialogue coach and collaborator, spoke of how he wrestled to find truth in his performances.

"He worked hard," she said.

"He was disciplined. He studied his roles and did his homework."

But then, when the cameras rolled, his performance took over and, "through an act of faith, he allowed himself to go to an uncharted place... He remained vulnerable and kept his heart open in his life and in his work."

The 51-year-old actor died of a heart attack last week while vacationing with his 13-year-old son in Italy. It was a cruel end to a holiday meant to be part of a summer Gandolfini was devoting to his family -- including his son and his nine-month-old daughter -- by even turning down a movie role, according to Aston, citing what she said was her final conversation with him.

Aston said he told her, "I don't want to lose any of the time I have with Michael and Lily this summer."

The actor's widow, Deborah Lin Gandolfini, also spoke at the ceremony, as did longtime friend Thomas Richardson, who affectionately described Gandolfini as a man "who hugged too tight and held too long." But now facing a world without hugs from Gandolfini, Richardson invited the congregation to stand and share hugs with their neighbours.

"It is in hugging that we are hugged," he declared.

A private family wake was held for Gandolfini Wednesday in New Jersey.

Broadway theatres paid tribute by dimming their lights briefly Wednesday night. Gandolfini was nominated for a Tony Award in 2009 as an actor in God of Carnage.

For Thursday's service, celebrities and fellow actors helped make up the capacity audience.

Those from The Sopranos included Edie Falco, Joe Pantoliano, Dominic Chianese, Steve Schirripa, Aida Turturro, Vincent Curatola, Tony Sirico, Lorraine Bracco, Steve Buscemi and Michael Imperioli.

Others from the entertainment community included Julianna Margulies, Alec Baldwin, Chris Noth, Marcia Gay Harden, Dick Cavett and Steve Carell.

NBC News' Brian Williams was in attendance. So was New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

So was Saul Stein, 60, a resident of Harlem.

"I came to pay my respects today because he's a character I identify with, a family man," Stein said as he waited in line outside the church.

 

-- The Associated Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition June 28, 2013 A21

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