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Truck's load strikes girder despite permits

Officials struggle to reroute traffic as investigation gets underway

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A car, lower right, and what is believed to be a travel trailer lie in the Skagit River with debris from the collapsed portion of the Interstate 5 bridge on  Friday in Mount Vernon, Wash. A truck carrying an oversize load struck the four-lane bridge on the major thoroughfare between Seattle and Canada, sending a section of the span and two vehicles into the Skagit River below Thursday evening. All three occupants suffered only minor injuries. At an overnight news conference, Washington State Patrol Chief John Batiste blamed the collapse on a tractor-trailer carrying a tall load that hit an upper part of the span.

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A car, lower right, and what is believed to be a travel trailer lie in the Skagit River with debris from the collapsed portion of the Interstate 5 bridge on Friday in Mount Vernon, Wash. A truck carrying an oversize load struck the four-lane bridge on the major thoroughfare between Seattle and Canada, sending a section of the span and two vehicles into the Skagit River below Thursday evening. All three occupants suffered only minor injuries. At an overnight news conference, Washington State Patrol Chief John Batiste blamed the collapse on a tractor-trailer carrying a tall load that hit an upper part of the span.

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. -- Federal officials were searching the country for a possible temporary replacement for a bridge that collapsed along the crucial Interstate 5 corridor, but Washington Gov. Jay Inslee cautioned Friday major disruptions will last for weeks, if not months.

A truck hauling an oversized load of drilling equipment hit an overhead bridge girder Thursday night, sending a section of the highway into the river below. The Alberta-based truck driver watched helplessly as the structure collapsed in his rear-view mirror. Two other vehicles plunged into the Skagit River, but all three occupants escaped with only minor injuries.

At a news conference, Inslee said federal officials were looking for a prefabricated structure to replace the 148-metre section that fell into the river. If one is found, a temporary fix could be in place in weeks. If one can't be quickly secured, the governor said it could be months before a replacement can be built.

"You cannot overstate the importance of this corridor to Washington state," Inslee said. Traffic on the interstate and surrounding roads was backed up for miles throughout the area, a situation the governor said would continue indefinitely.

"There will be substantial delays," he said.

Cynthia Scott, the wife of truck driver William Scott, said Friday from the couple's home near Spruce Grove, Alta., her husband saw the collapse.

"He looked in the mirrors and it just dropped out of sight," Cynthia Scott said. "I spoke to him seconds after it happened. He was just horrified."

The spectacular scene unfolded about 7 p.m. on the north section of the four-lane Interstate 5 bridge near Mount Vernon, about 100 kilometres north of Seattle and roughly 60 kilometres south of the Canadian border.

The Washington State Patrol said the truck driver works for Mullen Trucking in Alberta. The tractor-trailer was hauling drilling equipment southbound when the top right front corner of the load struck several trusses on the north end of the bridge, the patrol said.

Scott voluntarily gave a blood sample for an alcohol test and was not arrested. A top company official said the driver was amazed by what he saw happen.

"He's a little bit bewildered," Ed Scherbinski, vice-president of Mullen Trucking, said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Initially, it wasn't clear if the bridge just gave way on its own. But at an overnight news conference, Washington State Patrol Chief John Batiste blamed it on the too-tall load. The vertical clearance from the roadway to the beam is 4.45 metres.

The truck made it off the bridge and Scott remained at the scene and co-operated with investigators. Two other vehicles went into the water about 7.5 metres below as the structure crumbled. Three people were rescued and were recovering Friday.

The trucking company said it received a state permit to carry its oversized load across the bridge. Scherbinski said the state Department of Transportation had approved the company's plan to drive the equipment along I-5 to Vancouver, Wash.

He also said the company hired a local escort to help navigate the route. The driver was well-experienced with handling oversized loads, he said.

"This is what we do for a living. We pride ourselves in doing things the proper way," Scherbinski said.

Mike Allende, a state DOT spokesman, confirmed the truck had permits.

"We're still trying to figure out why it hit the bridge," he said. "It's ultimately up to the trucking company to figure out whether it can get through. It's their responsibility to make sure the load they have can travel on that route."

Dave Chesson, a state DOT spokesman, said there were no signs leading up to the bridge warning about its clearance height.

Inslee -- who issued an emergency proclamation for surrounding Skagit, Snohomish and Whatcom counties -- said it will cost $15 million to repair the bridge. The U.S. federal government has already promised the state $1 million in emergency funding.

Traffic could be affected for some time. The bridge is used by an average of 71,000 vehicles a day, so the roadblock will cause a major disruption in trade and tourism between Seattle and Vancouver, B.C.

-- The Associated Press

 

canadian trucker denies blame a27

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition May 25, 2013 A26

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