November 13, 2018

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Kiss on your own terms

We mine the Free Press archives for advice that still applies today (...or doesn’t)

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 28/12/2017 (320 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

From Mrs. Thompson Advises, published in the Winnipeg Free Press on Dec. 21, 1955.

Dear Mrs. Thompson: I have a problem which I think a lot of teenagers have, and it’s this: how to get out of a good-night kiss. It seems to me that most boys expect to be kissed goodnight, but I don’t like to kiss a boy unless I’m really fond of him.

A lot of boys that I go out with are just good friends, but they too expect a good-night kiss. I was wondering if you’d have any suggestions as to what I could say without hurting their feelings. — Teenager

Dear Teenager: Times have certainly changed since the days when nice girls weren’t supposed to let boys kiss them unless they were engaged. Now in many communities a good-night kiss is taken for granted, if the boy and girls are good friends and have had several dates, though it is always wise for a girl to not let a boy kiss her on a first or second date, or until a sense of comradeship has developed.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 28/12/2017 (320 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

From Mrs. Thompson Advises, published in the Winnipeg Free Press on Dec. 21, 1955.

Dear Mrs. Thompson: I have a problem which I think a lot of teenagers have, and it’s this: how to get out of a good-night kiss.  It seems to me that most boys expect to be kissed goodnight, but I don’t like to kiss a boy unless I’m really fond of him.

A lot of boys that I go out with are just good friends, but they too expect a good-night kiss. I was wondering if you’d have any suggestions as to what I could say without hurting their feelings. — Teenager

Downtown stores with extended holiday hours in December 1955 include Blond's Shoe Store, Fredric's, King's Limited, Daytons, Hollinsworth's, and Zellers (the latter noted as a "Retailer to Thrifty Canadians.") </p>

Downtown stores with extended holiday hours in December 1955 include Blond's Shoe Store, Fredric's, King's Limited, Daytons, Hollinsworth's, and Zellers (the latter noted as a "Retailer to Thrifty Canadians.")

Dear Teenager: Times have certainly changed since the days when nice girls weren’t supposed to let boys kiss them unless they were engaged. Now in many communities a good-night kiss is taken for granted, if the boy and girls are good friends and have had several dates, though it is always wise for a girl to not let a boy kiss her on a first or second date, or until a sense of comradeship has developed. 

However, once that stage is reached, a casual kiss is permissible. Not the lingering, emotion-charged variety, but an affectionate gesture which doesn’t say more than "I like you. Thank you for a pleasant evening."

You probably wouldn’t mind that sort of kiss, but have every right to object to anything more.  On first or second dates, to evade the issue, chat brightly until you get to your door, then say something about having a wonderful time and slip inside before the boy gets organized.

If that doesn’t work, and he reaches for you, laugh good-naturedly and pat him on the cheek. Say you’ll have to think that one over, as you only kiss very special friends.  This will make him think more of you than if it was evident anybody could kiss you, and he will probably try to graduate into the "special" category.  Then, if all he gets is a sisterly peck, he probably won’t pester you.

However, if you don’t want even that much demonstration of affection, it is your privilege to avoid it. You can still be popular and avoid hurting the boys’ feelings if you show them clearly, in other ways, that you like and admire them.  Say lightly, "Sorry, I’m not the kissing kind," and they won’t be offended.

 

Dear Mrs. Thompson: What, in your opinion, is the ideal way to spend New Year’s Eve? — Good Housekeeper

"It does so much for your party skirts or dresses -- the fitted, padded brassiere top molds you with confidence -- lightly boned torso and zipper back closing give excellent fit -- there are four detachable garters," reads this ad from December 1955. "Fashioned of luxury nylon and taffeta and tiered nylon net skirts. White only. In sizes A or B cups, 32 to 38." The $20 price tag in 1955 is equivalent to about $185 in 2017 dollars.</p>

"It does so much for your party skirts or dresses -- the fitted, padded brassiere top molds you with confidence -- lightly boned torso and zipper back closing give excellent fit -- there are four detachable garters," reads this ad from December 1955. "Fashioned of luxury nylon and taffeta and tiered nylon net skirts. White only. In sizes A or B cups, 32 to 38." The $20 price tag in 1955 is equivalent to about $185 in 2017 dollars.

Dear Good Housekeeper: I know what would be an ideal program for me, but my recipe might not suit other people. Scots, for instance, have long followed elaborate traditions for observing Hogmanay.

I like to spend New Year’s Eve which close friends, in a home, where everybody can feel relaxed and at east. People can chat, tell yarns, play silly games, dance, and gather around a piano and sing, while waiting for the whistles to blow.

There should be the comfortable feeling that somebody loves them, that they are fortunate in the present no matter what the past may have been, and that they can face the future with hope.  Joining hands and singing Auld Lang Syne is a comfortable ritual.

I don’t consider the whooping-it-up sort of celebration ideal. The end of one year and the beginning of another is a solemn occasion, calling for heart-searching and prayer as well as rejoicing.

Some people like to go to a watchnight service, then join friends for supper, and this form of celebration has much to recommend it. 

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