August 22, 2019

Winnipeg
20° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Opinion

Going through the motions

Printmaking meets performance art

Ming Hon’s The Exhibitionist.</p>

Ming Hon’s The Exhibitionist.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 9/6/2016 (1169 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Printmaking is a hands-on kind of art form. It’s craft-oriented, labour-intensive and repetitive by definition. Printmakers, as a demographic, are into that kind of thing. It’s no wonder then that many choose to highlight process in their work, to the extent that prints on paper become documents of various kinds of performance, rather than self-supporting artworks in their own right.

In different ways this is the case for each of the artists in Hivemind: Print + Performance at Martha Street Studio. It’s nice that they have this in common because, irrespective of their individual merits and despite the Borg-ish title, their works have little to say to one another.

Patrick Bulas and Jordan Schwab carved images into hockey pucks and used them to make slapshot “linocut prints.” I’m sure it was fun to do, but the handful of scuffs and lazily tacked-up hockey gear offer little to viewers. (Also, my willingness to feign interest in hockey begins and ends with cheering the Tampa Bay Lightning, my home team, as they breeze past the Jets in the playoffs race each year, so there’s that).

A slog to make but nice to look at, Audrey Hurd’s abstract prints were produced by rolling a ball of Plasticine clay covered in a liquid resist down a catwalk of lithographic stones (a video illustrates the process). The resulting printed marks meander across four sheets of paper alongside ghost images from past attempts, a lasting record of her Sisyphean waddle. I can imagine Hurd happy, but the point of the exercise, beyond a kind of existential statement of fact and a pleasing suite of images, escapes my grasp.

Keep reading free:

Already have an account? Log in here »

Keep reading free:

Already have an account? Log in here »

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 9/6/2016 (1169 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Printmaking is a hands-on kind of art form. It’s craft-oriented, labour-intensive and repetitive by definition. Printmakers, as a demographic, are into that kind of thing. It’s no wonder then that many choose to highlight process in their work, to the extent that prints on paper become documents of various kinds of performance, rather than self-supporting artworks in their own right.

In different ways this is the case for each of the artists in Hivemind: Print + Performance at Martha Street Studio. It’s nice that they have this in common because, irrespective of their individual merits and despite the Borg-ish title, their works have little to say to one another.

Patrick Bulas and Jordan Schwab carved images into hockey pucks and used them to make slapshot "linocut prints." I’m sure it was fun to do, but the handful of scuffs and lazily tacked-up hockey gear offer little to viewers. (Also, my willingness to feign interest in hockey begins and ends with cheering the Tampa Bay Lightning, my home team, as they breeze past the Jets in the playoffs race each year, so there’s that).

A slog to make but nice to look at, Audrey Hurd’s abstract prints were produced by rolling a ball of Plasticine clay covered in a liquid resist down a catwalk of lithographic stones (a video illustrates the process). The resulting printed marks meander across four sheets of paper alongside ghost images from past attempts, a lasting record of her Sisyphean waddle. I can imagine Hurd happy, but the point of the exercise, beyond a kind of existential statement of fact and a pleasing suite of images, escapes my grasp.

Ming Hon’s The Exhibitionist: wreckage of the unhinged</p>

Ming Hon’s The Exhibitionist: wreckage of the unhinged

Local contemporary-dancer-cum-visual-artist Ming Hon aggressively steals the show, as she’ll do, with a restaging of her performance The Exhibitionist. In the piece, the wreckage of which litters half the gallery (leaving a mess is a hallmark of hers), she embodies the titular character, a kind of unhinged corporate creative type. In the role, Hon puts ’em on the glass, (presses her face and body against the glass) pantomiming sex with a Xerox machine to birth a squad of photocopied mini-Mings.

I caught an earlier iteration of the performance at the University of Manitoba a few years back, and while some of you might happily watch a grown woman grunting and grinding on a Craigslisted Document Centre for the rest of your days, once was enough for me. I skipped the opening, which proved just as well: distanced from the spectacle Hon invariably makes of herself, the piece’s dishevelled critique of ego and the daily grind, not just of artistic work but of parenthood and work in general, registers more clearly.

The loveliest work in the show, meanwhile, comes courtesy of Kristie MacDonald, who retrofits a chest of drawers to create a self-contained printing press. Using an embossing plate of the type used to foil-stamp greeting cards, MacDonald reproduces a found postcard evocatively inscribed, "still heading north." Stacks of ghost-letters materialize though the very action of shutting them away in drawers, unsent.

Though uneven, the show effectively demonstrates how artists might use performance to expand the boundaries of printmaking. It’s true of most performances that you really had to be there, and that may be the case here, but it’s still nice to get a postcard.

Steven Leyden Cochrane is a Winnipeg-based artist, writer, and educator.

Audrey Hurd creates Stone Tracks.</p>

Audrey Hurd creates Stone Tracks.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

History

Updated on Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 8:59 AM CDT: Adds photos

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us