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Country legend Clement dies at 82

NASHVILLE -- "Cowboy" Jack Clement, a producer, engineer, songwriter and beloved figure who helped give birth to rock 'n' roll and push country music into modern times, has died. He was 82.

Clement died Thursday morning, just months after learning he would be joining the Country Music Hall of Fame, a fitting tip of the cowboy hat to the man whose personal story is entwined with the roots of rock 'n' roll like few others. He was to be inducted at a ceremony later this fall.

Clement's career included stops in Memphis at Sun Records, where he discovered Jerry Lee Lewis, and Nashville, where he was a close collaborator of Johnny Cash, Charley Pride and fellow 2013 inductee Bobby Bare.

-- The Associated Press

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 8/8/2013 (1507 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

NASHVILLE — "Cowboy" Jack Clement, a producer, engineer, songwriter and beloved figure who helped give birth to rock 'n' roll and push country music into modern times, has died. He was 82.

Clement died Thursday morning, just months after learning he would be joining the Country Music Hall of Fame, a fitting tip of the cowboy hat to the man whose personal story is entwined with the roots of rock 'n' roll like few others. He was to be inducted at a ceremony later this fall.

Clement's career included stops in Memphis at Sun Records, where he discovered Jerry Lee Lewis, and Nashville, where he was a close collaborator of Johnny Cash, Charley Pride and fellow 2013 inductee Bobby Bare.

— The Associated Press

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