September 21, 2018

Winnipeg
6° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Even Santana can hit the occasional sour note

Some songs we don't want to hear at show

<p>Carlos Santana (left) teamed up with Pitbull in 2014 on a track called Oye. It’s one of several collaborative efforts the mercurial guitarist has undertaken with less than stellar results.</p>

CHRIS PIZZELLO / INVISION FILES

Carlos Santana (left) teamed up with Pitbull in 2014 on a track called Oye. It’s one of several collaborative efforts the mercurial guitarist has undertaken with less than stellar results.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 13/3/2018 (192 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Carlos Santana is one of the best living guitarists in the world.

In the 1960s, he and his band were known for the kind of drug-induced psychedelic rock pouring out of their hometown of San Francisco, and the group made its mark on the music industry with an unforgettable performance at Woodstock in 1969, followed by a successful self-titled debut record.

Two more albums came down the pipe quickly, both of which hit No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard 200, but numerous lineup changes slowed momentum, and by 1980, Santana’s commercial success had declined significantly.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 60 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Join free for 60 days

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 60 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 13/3/2018 (192 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Carlos Santana is one of the best living guitarists in the world.

In the 1960s, he and his band were known for the kind of drug-induced psychedelic rock pouring out of their hometown of San Francisco, and the group made its mark on the music industry with an unforgettable performance at Woodstock in 1969, followed by a successful self-titled debut record.

<p>Carlos Santana, right, and Rob Thomas perform onstage at the annual Pre-GRAMMY Gala in 2010.

VINCE BUCCI / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Carlos Santana, right, and Rob Thomas perform onstage at the annual Pre-GRAMMY Gala in 2010.

Two more albums came down the pipe quickly, both of which hit No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard 200, but numerous lineup changes slowed momentum, and by 1980, Santana’s commercial success had declined significantly.

It wasn’t until 1999’s Supernatural that things began to turn around.

The album was focused on collaborations with notable artsits of the time and included the track Smooth, featuring Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20, which would become Santana’s most successful single to date and one of the most successful singles of all time. It reached No. 1 on two separate occasions several months apart. That album earned nine Grammy Awards and sold 30 million copies worldwide.

Since then, Santana has become known for their high-hitting partnerships with artists from all genres, and though the band has a remarkable track record when it comes to commercially successful collaborations, there are a few questionable moments in their 24-studio-album catalogue.

Here are few we’re hoping won’t make the setlist for Santana’s show at Bell MTS Place tonight:

 

Santana ft. PitbullOye 2014 (2014)

A lot of things about this pairing make sense — most obviously there’s the Latin connection. Santana is Mexican-American and Pitbull is of Cuban descent, so their overall vibe goes together well. There are also a lot of things that don’t make sense though, such as including Pitbull on this track at all (I am only partially kidding).

Full disclaimer, I don’t hate Pitbull. He’s found his niche and he’s working it, and I can’t fault him for making a multimillion-dollar career out of sing-talking and being sexy in a charming way. However, I can fault him for contributing so little to a track that could actually be a lot of fun if a bit more effort had been put in. "What I got, you want it, what you got, I need it," he grumbles, using the basic lyrics to every Pitbull song that has ever existed (see: I Know You Want Me, I Wanna, etc.). There’s also this gem: "We making history baby like Nelson Mandela did." Comparing the work of Pitbull, or even Carlos Santana to the legacy of the man who played a large role in ending apartheid, and who became the father of modern South Africa, is not accurate in any possible way. Sorry, Pitbull, party’s over.

 

Santana ft. Bo BiceBrown Skin Girl (2005)

You may be thinking to yourself, "Who the hell is Bo Bice?" And that is an appropriate response when the name of an American Idol runner-up appears on Santana’s album All That I Am, next to legitimate superstars such as Mary J. Blige and Steven Tyler. This whole song begs the question, "Why?" Why is there a white guy singing a song called Brown Skin Girl? Why is that guy Bo Bice? Why is this a thing that anyone thought was a fun and good idea? The song itself is admittedly catchy, but wholly unremarkable. Even Carlos’s usually stand-out solos lack their usual punch and fire, as if being dragged down by the rest of the lacklustre track.

 

Santana ft. Chad KroegerWhy Don’t You & I (2002)

You knew this moment was coming — how could we exclude perhaps the second-most popular Santana collab of all time? Those opening horns and the guitar riff! The weird bird-like tweeting happening in the background! Stomachs "filled with the butterflies!" Oooh, it’s not all right, Kroeger. Why Don’t You & I, off of Santana’s Shaman album, made it to No. 1 on the U.S. Adult Top 40 Billboard chart, and peaked at No. 3 on the Mainstream Top 40. But that is not an indicator of its quality. To be fair, Santana’s contribution to this track is great, as always, but there’s just something so off-putting about Kroeger singing the almost child-like lyrics of this love song. Not to mention the Nickelback frontman’s power chords in the chorus drown out any style or finesse Carlos is trying to put down. If this were to ever be re-recorded, I would suggest Carly Rae Jepsen as a replacement vocalist to pop it up a bit (though a second version already exists with the equally awkward choice of Alex Band from the Calling).

 

Santana ft. DidoFeels Like Fire (2002)

Literally the next song on Shaman after the Kroeger debacle is a wonky piece of work featuring Dido, Feels Like Fire. If you don’t remember Dido, she had about 30 minutes of fame in North America in the early 2000s with the songs Thank You and White Flag, as well as a featured vocal spot on the massive Eminem single Stan (which was just the opening line of Thank You, so, she really got her mileage on that one). The British songstress has an ethereal and chilled-out vocal style that doesn’t mesh well with Carlos’s blistering licks, which actually seem watered down on this track, perhaps as to not overshadow Dido and her wet-rag style of singing. He does manage to squeak a little solo in near the end that kind of saves the song, but overall, this collaboration with Dido is a Di-don’t.

erin.lebar@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @NireRabel

Erin Lebar

Erin Lebar
Multimedia producer

Erin Lebar is a multimedia producer who spends most of her time writing music- and culture-related stories for the Arts & Life section. She also co-hosts the Winnipeg Free Press's weekly pop-culture podcast, Bury the Lede.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

History

Updated on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at 10:46 AM CDT: Cutline fixed.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.