October 23, 2017

Winnipeg
7° C, Overcast

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Simply bovine

Eatery offers good selection of local beer, upscale burgers and bar snacks

TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Josh Nesojednik, owner, holding the Bacon Poutine and the Winnipegger Burger at the Tipsy Cow.</p></p>

TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Josh Nesojednik, owner, holding the Bacon Poutine and the Winnipegger Burger at the Tipsy Cow.

Taking over a high-turnover location on Portage Avenue, the Tipsy Cow folks are off to a solid start with a brightened-up interior, welcoming service and a focused menu.

As the name suggests, this casual venue is a combo of bar — packed with good local beer — and upscale burgers and bar snacks.

You can kick things off with candied bacon, a crazy, concentrated fusion of fat, salt and sweet, which involves strips of smoked bacon, augmented with sea salt and sugar and thick enough to stand upright in a glass.

There are other finger foods on offer, including house-fried chips and dip, a charcuterie plate and chicken wings. The sampled Korean barbecued wings were nicely sauced, but could have been be crispier.

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 452 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for articles you wish to read.

Hope you enjoyed your trial.

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 452 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for articles you wish to read.

Taking over a high-turnover location on Portage Avenue, the Tipsy Cow folks are off to a solid start with a brightened-up interior, welcoming service and a focused menu.

As the name suggests, this casual venue is a combo of bar — packed with good local beer — and upscale burgers and bar snacks.

You can kick things off with candied bacon, a crazy, concentrated fusion of fat, salt and sweet, which involves strips of smoked bacon, augmented with sea salt and sugar and thick enough to stand upright in a glass.

There are other finger foods on offer, including house-fried chips and dip, a charcuterie plate and chicken wings. The sampled Korean barbecued wings were nicely sauced, but could have been be crispier.

Burgers, which form the core of the menu, are good in the fundamentals. Beef patties, made from fresh-ground chuck, are juicy and served on good bread, including rich, toasted brioche buns with shiny brown tops.

The fixings range from to old-school to zhooshed-up (whisky onions, peppercorn aioli, house-pickled jalapeño). Fries are fresh-cut and good, and onion rings are tender and crisp.

The menu, which includes rotating specials, is fairly bacony and beefy — the place is called Tipsy Cow, after all — but the veggie burger is not just an afterthought. With vegetarian burgers, there’s often a compromise between structural integrity — does it hang together? — and taste. This black bean-based patty fell apart a bit, but had a nice, slightly spicy flavour, intensified by the garlic chip and apple slaw toppings.

The "Soups, Greens and Things" category ("things"?) includes a creamy caesar salad, with more of that good bacon, and two soups — an eclectic borscht, packed with good stuff but oversalted, and a chicken herb that was generous with noodles and roasted chicken, but maybe too generous with the herbs, which seemed to be manhandling the broth.

There are several poutine options. The classic features gloriously straight-up and unsubtle beef gravy — and you really don’t want to get too fancy here — and big chunks of Quebec cheese curds. And yes, you can order a version with more of that swell bacon.

The chili fries, which include Winnipeg-style chili sauce, Bothwell marble cheese, chives, garlic chips and a fried egg, were tasty but a mite dry.

The dessert menu is brief. A sampled ice cream sandwich featured Cornell ice cream and homemade cookies drizzled with salted caramel (unfortunately, oversalted). Another sweet option would be a thick and creamy milkshake, which can be tipsied up with a shot of booze for an extra $4.

The drinks menu is an extensive booklet (though it involves different typefaces on each page, which drove the font snobs at my table to distraction). There’s a focus on beer, with plenty of local brews in bottles and on tap — from Torque, Half Pints, Barn Hammer, Little Brown Jug and OGC. There is also Tall Grass vodka and gin from Capital K, the Winnipeg-based distillery. Classic cocktails include a frothy, zippy whisky sour (a $5 special on Whisky Thursday).

Tipsy Cow’s space is long and narrow, and the new owners have worked with this layout by placing a stretched-out bar near the front and a quieter seating area at the back, with neutral brown fittings and furniture, and cream walls. Proximity to Bell MTS Place means there are inevitably TV screens with sports, but at least they aren’t too loud.

alison.gillmor@freepress.mb.ca

Read more by Alison Gillmor.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.