WEATHER ALERT

Training basket: Kristin Madsen

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Four years ago, the Downtown Nordic ski club started with six friends getting together to stay in shape and do something they love. Their passion for cross-country skiing, healthy living and socializing during the cold winter months has since blossomed into a program with 140 members.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 13/12/2014 (2969 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Four years ago, the Downtown Nordic ski club started with six friends getting together to stay in shape and do something they love. Their passion for cross-country skiing, healthy living and socializing during the cold winter months has since blossomed into a program with 140 members.

“Through word of mouth and over the years it’s grown so much because it’s a need that we have,” says Kristin Madsen, an instructor and one of the original six members, which include club founder and competitive skier Steve Scoles. “There’s a lot of camaraderie, everyone is friends. It’s awesome getting people out to ski — everyone from experienced racers to people their first time on skis.”

For Madsen, it doesn’t get much better.

“When I’m working out I’m surrounding myself with people who are really positive — I love it,” she says. “It’s fun and I know for me it’s really important it becomes a lifestyle for my kids as well. We go skiing on Saturdays as a family.”

Madsen has a long athletic history. She ran track and played basketball in high school before moving on to competitive rowing for eight years. She skied on a competitive racing team called Prairie Storm (now Wind Chill) for 15 years before becoming an instructor. She and her husband Mike have two daughters, Sarah and Kaitlyn.

She remains one of the top female skiers in the province. The club also includes high schooler Levi Nadlersmith, who is one of the top young skiers in Canada.

The club has a wide age range of members — from five-year-olds in the Jackrabbits program to their oldest skier, who is 78 years old. Six coaches teach in three different categories: beginner, intermediate and advanced.

 

What’s your favourite workout?

“I love them all. I really enjoy when Steve (Scoles) and I go out and do intervals, anything that involves climbing hills.”

 

What’s the most important thing about working out and staying healthy?

“It’s a lifestyle. It’s doing hill bounding and strength training and eating well.”

 

What sorts of training do you do when there’s no snow?

“In the fall, Steve meets with the group and does hill running at Westview Park (Garbage Hill). We ski all winter but don’t meet in the summer. (But) those of us who race meet during the summer and do hill climbing and intervals. We run, we do lots of biking, we have roller skis and a lot of people roller ski around Birds Hill Park. A lot of getting the fitness base ready, cross training and weights.”

 

Does the club travel very far for races?

“We have a couple weekend trips planned for Mantario Trail Cabin. We encourage people to get into racing as well. There’s lots of races at Windsor Park Nordic Centre in St. Vital every Wednesday. Some weekends we go to Pinawa, Kenora and sometimes Falcon Lake.”

 

What do you eat to go with your healthy lifestyle?

We don’t eat out a lot, we cook our own meals. I don’t eat anything that’s processed. Even granola bars we make our own. If you can’t read the ingredients, don’t eat it. Our kids eat anything. Right from Day One, they’ve eaten kale, spinach, tofu and quinoa, lots of fruits and vegetables.”


Any guilty pleasure foods?

“Chocolate. You need to have a positive attitude with food. We eat well most of the time and if we have guilty pleasures that’s great, too. You don’t need to feel guilty about it because if you eat well most of the time then it’s OK to treat yourself.”

stephen.burns@freepress.mb.ca

History

Updated on Saturday, December 13, 2014 11:49 AM CST: Alters headline.

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