July 8, 2020

Winnipeg
27° C, Fair

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Don't come from away: A look at COVID-19 travel restrictions across Canada

This July 13, 2010 photo shows the road along the Cabot Trail in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. If you're looking to explore Canada this summer, you'll first have to navigate the fluctuating patchwork of travel restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of the novel coronavirus throughout the country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Glenn Adams

This July 13, 2010 photo shows the road along the Cabot Trail in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. If you're looking to explore Canada this summer, you'll first have to navigate the fluctuating patchwork of travel restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of the novel coronavirus throughout the country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Glenn Adams

If you're looking to explore Canada this summer, you'll first have to navigate the fluctuating patchwork of travel restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of the novel coronavirus throughout the country.

Here's a look at some of the rules for domestic travel in each province and territory:

Alberta

Albertans are allowed to travel within the province, including to vacation homes, cabins, hotels, campgrounds and national and provincial parks. Travellers are asked to abide by physical distancing guidelines, and use the province's mobile contact tracing app while out in public.

There are no border closures or checkpoints. However, officials are advising against non-essential travel in or out of the province until the next phase of Alberta's reopening strategy.

British Columbia

British Columbia is advising people to avoid non-essential travel within and outside of the province. That includes limiting trips to neighbouring towns, but residents are encouraged to explore their own communities.

The province's borders remain open. However, some roads crossing into Yukon and the Northwest Territories are restricted to essential travel.

Earlier this month, BC Parks reopened most provincial campgrounds and back-country camping. Hotels and resorts are expected to follow.

Ferries are still sailing, but service levels have been reduced. Boat tours are barred from operating until June 30 at the earliest.

Manitoba

Residents can now travel directly to cottages, campgrounds and parks north of the 53rd parallel. They are asked to avoid going into local or First Nations communities, but if they must they're asked to follow physical distancing protocols.

Currently, travellers coming to Manitoba from outside the province are required to self-isolate for two weeks.

On June 21, the province is expected to lift restrictions on travellers from Western Canada and northwestern Ontario.

New Brunswick

New Brunswick has banned all "unnecessary" travel into the province. Peace officers screen travellers at the border, and can turn people away.

People who have travelled outside New Brunswick are required to self-isolate for 14 days upon entry.

A cluster of new COVID-19 cases prompted the province to snap back restrictions in the Campbellton area, including limiting non-essential trips to and from the region.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Non-residents are barred from entering Newfoundland and Labrador, except in extenuating circumstances.

Travel within the province is permitted, including to second homes, parks and campgrounds.

Nova Scotia

Visitors don't need permission to enter Nova Scotia, but are required to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival.

There are no restrictions on movement within the province, but travellers are asked to abide by guidelines on physical distancing and gatherings.

Private campgrounds have reopened, but only at 50 per cent capacity and they must ensure public health protocols are followed, including adequate distancing between campsites. Cottagers can visit their vacation homes.

Ontario

Ontario strongly discourages non-essential trips, but has yet to lay out formal rules about travel. Those who do venture away from home are asked to follow public health guidelines including physical distancing. There are no border restrictions or self-isolation requirements for those visiting from another province or territory.

Prince Edward Island

All non-essential visits to the Island are prohibited.

Premier Dennis King says people who want to travel to seasonal residences must apply for approval and undergo a risk assessment. Seasonal residents will also be tested for COVID-19 and they must spend two weeks in self-isolation after arriving in the province.

Quebec

Quebec has removed police checkpoints aimed at limiting non-essential traffic throughout the province, with the exceptions of Nunavik and the Cree Territory of James Bay.

Even as the province reopens, the government is urging people to not visit other regions.

Saskatchewan

The province is lifting a ban on non-essential travel in the north.

Recreational travel within the province is permitted, but the province warns there are restrictions that could impact your trip.

Some private campgrounds and regional parks have reopened. Only Saskatchewan residents are allowed to camp in provincial parks.

Officials are asking residents to limit non-essential travel outside the province. People who re-enter Saskatchewan are not required to self-isolate, but are asked to monitor for potential COVID-19 symptoms.

Nunavut

Dr. Michael Patterson, Nunavut's chief public health officer, says the territory won't be open to visitors any time soon. He's indicated that the travel ban will be one of the last public-health measures to be lifted.

The department of health services says on its website that "travel into Nunavut single biggest risk for introducing COVID-19."

Nunavummiut who leave the province are required to undergo a 14-day isolation period at a designated isolation site.

Yukon

Travel restrictions will be lifted between Yukon and B.C. after July 1 under the second phase of the territory's pandemic restart plan.

After that date, travellers between the province and territory will no longer be required to self-isolate for 14 days.

The territory says monitoring the status of neighbouring jurisdictions will determine if it's safe to further lift restrictions.

Territorial parks and campgrounds have reopened for summer.

Northwest Territories

Northwest Territories's travel rules have been mired in confusion, but the premier has hinted that changes could be coming soon.

Health Minister Diane Thom said Wednesday that the territory's initial travel ban was too broad, citing charter rights ensuring that Canadians can move freely throughout the country.

However, Thom noted the territory can restrict travel within its borders.

Under current orders, all people entering N.W.T. must pass through a checkpoint and inform a border officer of their travel plans.

If travellers don't meet requirements for entry, they must apply for an "exceptional circumstance exemption" and self-isolate for two weeks in order to cross the border. Otherwise, they'll have to turn around.

People arriving from outside the territory, including residents, must self-isolate in one of four communities: Yellowknife, Inuvik, Hay River or Fort Smith. The government will arrange accommodations to allow residents of small communities to self-isolate in one of the designated communities before heading home.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 12, 2020.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Your support has enabled us to provide free access to stories about COVID-19 because we believe everyone deserves trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

Our readership has contributed additional funding to give Free Press online subscriptions to those that can’t afford one in these extraordinary times — giving new readers the opportunity to see beyond the headlines and connect with other stories about their community.

To those who have made donations, thank you.

To those able to give and share our journalism with others, please Pay it Forward.

The Free Press has shared COVID-19 stories free of charge because we believe everyone deserves access to trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

While we stand by this decision, it has undoubtedly affected our bottom line.

After nearly 150 years of reporting on our city, we don’t want to stop any time soon. With your support, we’ll be able to forge ahead with our journalistic mission.

If you believe in an independent, transparent, and democratic press, please consider subscribing today.

We understand that some readers cannot afford a subscription during these difficult times and invite them to apply for a free digital subscription through our Pay it Forward program.

The Free Press will close this commenting platform at noon on July 14.

We want to thank those who have shared their views over the years as part of this reader engagement initiative.

In the coming weeks, the Free Press will announce new opportunities for readers to share their thoughts and to engage with our staff and each other.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us