When Alexa Kovacs first started throwing around a Frisbee in high school, she had no idea of how far it would lead her.

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This article was published 15/8/2015 (2229 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

When Alexa Kovacs first started throwing around a Frisbee in high school, she had no idea of how far it would lead her.

This week, Kovacs is competing with her Fusion teammates for a national title at the Canadian Ultimate Championships, which is currently being held in Winnipeg.

Alexa Kovacs, who plays ultimate for Fusion, at practise in Assiniboine Park. John Woods / Winnipeg Free Press

WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Alexa Kovacs, who plays ultimate for Fusion, at practise in Assiniboine Park. John Woods / Winnipeg Free Press

 

"I'd been playing only a few months and I was at nationals," Kovacs said of when she was asked to join her high school team. "I just kind of jumped in with both feet when I started."

She says she could run and catch when she started. She was athletic, but had no real Ultimate skills.

Kovacs says times have changed in that regard. Players are now expected to know how to make good throws, have good understanding of the game and possess a strong athletic background.

Kovacs, who heads up her team's practices, says fitness is a big part of the game and for the team which works out three times a week.

"Players are strongly encouraged to do training on their own," she said. "I like to allocate time at the end of our practices for conditioning -- running and strength training -- and I like to have a practice once a week most focused on that sort of thing. We put a big emphasis on it."

Kovacs says she'll play Ultimate until she doesn't feel like she can be a solid contributor anymore. At that point, she'd like to become a coach -- a person she wishes her team had at the moment.

"The sport as a whole is not quite yet consistent with having coaches on the team, the sport is just so young still and a lot of the players are still playing," she said. "We've been open to it for years, and I'd appreciate it so I could just focus on being a player. And I know the team would appreciate it."

Kovac says she would want to coach junior-age level players.

"They're the future of this team, they're us in five years, and if we don't develop them at this level it's hard to make plans for the future," she said.

"Someday, I'd love to me more involved in the junior program. It's about giving back and it's rewarding."

scott.billeck@freepress.mb.ca