Martin Cash

Martin Cash

Reporter

Martin Cash has been writing a column and business news at the Free Press since 1989. Over those years he’s written through a number of business cycles and the rise and fall (and rise) in fortunes of many local businesses.

He grew up in suburban Toronto in a family of seven where his siblings and friends from back in the day still don’t believe Martin has been a business chronicler all these years, never having shown a propensity for economics or high finance in his younger days.

He studied history and philosophy at the University of Toronto and journalism at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute (it had not yet matured into a university).

One of his first professional reporting assignments, as a weekend reporter at the Globe and Mail, was to cover a water-skiing exhibition by a blind skier who tragically crashed into a ski-jump ramp on the lake, giving Martin his first big break.

He arrived in Manitoba to take a position at the Thompson Citizen on a frosty morning in January 1985, and has been calling himself a proud Manitoban ever since.

A short stint covering the Manitoba Legislature some years ago firmed up his acquired taste for the more fact-based dynamic of the business world.

Martin was a finalist for a National Newspaper Award in 2001 for work he produced for the Free Press on a bitter strike at Versatile Tractors. He has recently become a go-to judge of business competitions for the city’s bustling entrepreneurial community.

He and his wife Susan Brasher have two beautiful daughters — Madi, an accomplished furniture designer, and Emma, a student at the U of W.

Recent articles of Martin Cash

Transit rides ‘transformative’ change with first 16 electric buses

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Transit rides ‘transformative’ change with first 16 electric buses

Martin Cash 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 25, 2022

Ten years after Winnipeg Transit and New Flyer started a pilot project with four battery-electric buses, the city is now in the final stages of purchasing its first 16 of the state-of-the-art electric buses.

The city’s public works committee is expected to approve the $33-million contract with hometown NFI Group (formerly New Flyer), the leading electric bus maker in North America.

The city is still waiting for final written confirmation of funding from the tri-level Investing in Canada infrastructure Program (ICIP), but Janice Lukes, chair of that committee, said there are no concerns.

“The funding is in place,” she said. “We’re every excited.”

Friday, Nov. 25, 2022

Supplied

Winnipeg Transit is preparing to add 16 NFI electric buses to its fleet.

City’s commercial real estate in pretty good shape

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

City’s commercial real estate in pretty good shape

Martin Cash 4 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022

Asked to discuss the current state of the commercial real estate industry in Winnipeg, the knee-jerk reaction might be to say it is in the doldrums.

How could it be otherwise after more than two years of periodic lockdowns and social distancing, high interest rates, rising inflation and a potential recession.

But that would not be the whole story.

Yes, at Wednesday’s annual state of the industry conference held by BOMA (Building Owners and Managers Association), industry professionals heard that office vacancies are high but that was expected

Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022

Wind in their sails

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Wind in their sails

Martin Cash 4 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022

A small alternative energy company in St. Malo is one of only four companies from around the world selected by Vodafone, the massive U.K. telco, to solve some pressing renewable energy challenges for its cell tower network.

Kynetic Energy Solutions won Vodafone’s renewable power challenge and, if successful, could end up being in line for millions of dollars worth of work.

Kynetic owns the rights to manufacture a unique vertical wind turbine that can generate small amounts of power with very little wind.

The company, which is the only manufacturer of vertical turbines in Canada, put development of the technology on hold during the pandemic. It has only one installation at its shop in St. Malo.

Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Maynard and Walker have identified 1.2 million remote cell phone sites in the world powered by costly, polluting diesel generators.

Four founders of e-commerce company bring in experienced executives to enhance growth

Martin Cash 5 minute read Preview

Four founders of e-commerce company bring in experienced executives to enhance growth

Martin Cash 5 minute read Saturday, Nov. 19, 2022

Bold Commerce went through an awful lot of change during the pandemic and coming out the other end it has a new strategy, a brand new website and logo… and a new CEO.

It’s still bold, but now it’s BOLD-er, (it’s logo changed from all lower case to all upper case lettering).

Three of the four founders who started the company in a small office in Ile des Chenes making apps for Shopify’s e-commerce platform are still there, but the company has hired outside professionals to the positions they had previously held.

Peter Karpas, a Silicon Valley based tech executive who’s spent time with PayPal, Intuit and other fin-tech companies is Bold’s new CEO taking over from Yvan Boisjoli.

Saturday, Nov. 19, 2022

SUBMITTED

Bold Commerce executives, from left, former CEO Yvan Boisjoli, new CEO Peter Karpas, former chief technology officer Eric Boisjoli and former chief marketing officer Jay Myers.

Skip the headhunters; new CEO delivered from within

Martin Cash 3 minute read Preview

Skip the headhunters; new CEO delivered from within

Martin Cash 3 minute read Friday, Nov. 18, 2022

SkipTheDishes has a new CEO.

Howard Migdal, who has been in the industry for 16 years, the last four as Skip’s chief operating officer, is taking over from Kevin Edwards who is retiring.

Migdal is one of the pioneers in the food delivery business, having co-founded a company called Grub Canada in 2008.

That business was acquired by Just Eat in 2011, a year before SkipTheDishes was founded in Winnipeg.

Friday, Nov. 18, 2022

Howard Migdal, new CEO of SkiptheDishes

Portage and Main tower invests in downtown revitalization

Martin Cash 5 minute read Preview

Portage and Main tower invests in downtown revitalization

Martin Cash 5 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022

What better way to support the revitalization of Winnipeg’s downtown than to spruce up one of its Portage and Main office towers?

Among other things, that was the thinking at Regina-based Harvard Developments, which has owned 201 Portage, the Portage and Main office tower, since 2014.

On Wednesday afternoon, the company held a splashy event in the lobby, the site of most of the $25 million it has invested in the building over the past three years.

Featuring imported marble flooring from Italy, a new glassed-in second floor office space (still available to be leased) that looks over the lobby and its newest tenant — a 6,000-square-foot BMO flagship branch.

Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022

Among the additions is 529 Uptown, a sister of steakhouse 529 Wellington. (Supplied)

KUB Bakery's closure leaves big hole in Winnipeggers' hearts (and stomachs)

Martin Cash and Gabrielle Piché 5 minute read Preview

KUB Bakery's closure leaves big hole in Winnipeggers' hearts (and stomachs)

Martin Cash and Gabrielle Piché 5 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022

Winnipeg socials may never recover.

KUB Bakery, the family owned, near-century-old bakery that produces the singular, chewy rye bread familiar to generations, reluctantly closed its doors this week, another victim of the pandemic and its high-inflation aftermath.

KUB — the name stands for Kucher’s Ukrainian Bakery, after founder Alex Kucher — had been dealing with declining sales and skyrocketing input costs. Added to that, the bakery’s retail store suffered a significant loss of business over the summer because of season-long road work on Erin Street.

Ross Einfeld, whose family bought the bakery in 1982, said he’s talking to prospective buyers; there’s a chance the 99-year-old name could live on.

Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022

Ross Einfeld in the now empty KUB Bakery, which has closed its door. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

AIMDay fosters collaborations between industry, academia

Martin Cash 5 minute read Preview

AIMDay fosters collaborations between industry, academia

Martin Cash 5 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022

The challenge of establishing more industry-academia collaborations in Manitoba seems never to be resolved.

Politicians, industry leaders, academics all bemoan the fact that it doesn’t happen enough.

But there is no one correct way to do it that excludes all others, so the search for the best practice ought never end.

About three years ago, the Manitoba Industry-Academia Partnership was formed with funding from PrairiesCan (formerly Western Economic Diversification) to help foster partnerships for the sake of the prosperity of the whole province.

Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022

Myrna Grahn, the manager of Manitoba Industry-Academia Partnership, says they are gaining some traction getting academia, the sector councils, governments and different industry organizations working more collaboratively. (Supplied)

Province beefs up mining department with $5M investment

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Province beefs up mining department with $5M investment

Martin Cash 4 minute read Monday, Nov. 14, 2022

This week’s Central Canada Minerals Exploration Convention in Winnipeg is the first time the mining industry has met en masse since before the pandemic.

During that time span demand for critical minerals that are part of the electrification supply chain has spiked, which means mineral exploration companies around the world are scrambling to find critical minerals such as lithium and to increase production in minerals such as copper and nickel.

Manitoba was once the darling of the sector having the jurisdiction with the highest ranking in the Fraser Institute’s annual survey. But the province’s reputation has sagged as has actual exploration activity.

The province’s Natural Resources and Northern Development Minister Greg Nesbitt used the conference as the venue to announce a $5-million investment in beefing up the department that industry officials have long complained was understaffed.

Monday, Nov. 14, 2022

Natural Resources and Northern Development Minister Greg Nesbitt says hiring has started to fill 19 positions in the hopes of speeding up the review and processing of mining permits and increasing Indigenous participation in mineral development activities. (Supplied)

Gardewine’s electric vans leading the charge

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Gardewine’s electric vans leading the charge

Martin Cash 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 11, 2022

A year after experimenting with the region’s first electric shunt truck to move trailers around its yard, Gardewine has likely become the first commercial carrier in Western Canada to put a small fleet of electric courier vans on the road.

Gardewine will deploy the seven zero-emission electric Ford Transit vans in cities such as Thompson, Dauphin, Brandon and Winnipeg to deliver cargo under 23 kilograms to the last mile.

The vehicles will have capacity to travel about 200 kilometres fully charged.

Gardewine president and chief operating officer Darin Downey said the industry needs to make a commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and he’s proud that Gardewine, owned by the Calgary-based Mullen Group, is a leader.

Friday, Nov. 11, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Darin Downey, president and chief operating officer of Gardewine, charges up one of a fleet of seven zero-emission Ford Transit vans the company has invested in.

Moving the needle on Indigenous-first diversity

Martin Cash 5 minute read Preview

Moving the needle on Indigenous-first diversity

Martin Cash 5 minute read Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022

Among the film industry players and politicians in the Manitoba mission to Los Angeles a week ago to meet with the Hollywood film industry was a highly accomplished Indigenous educator and policy creator and advocate.

Rebecca Chartrand was asked to join the group on the chance that industry big-wigs might grill the local industry promoters about diversity representation.

As it turned out, they did.

Chartrand’s presence there — along with the industry’s bona fides when it comes to the number of productions of Indigenous stories — proved to be an important boost for what was by all accounts a fruitful trip.

Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022

Ben Carr (from left), VP of Government Stakeholder Relations, Rebecca Chartrand, President and CEO, and Michelle Boivin, VP Communications and Community Engagement have started the Indigenous Strategy Alliance to help with diversity in the film industry. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)

Innovation Growth Fund grants $900K to 12 projects

Martin Cash 2 minute read Preview

Innovation Growth Fund grants $900K to 12 projects

Martin Cash 2 minute read Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022

The latest tranche of recipients of grants from the provinces’ Innovation Growth Fund — $900,000 for 12 projects — was announced this week.

The program provides up to $100,000 in non-repayable grants on a 50-50 cost-sharing basis for projects that develop and commercialize innovative products or processes.

Companies receiving grants include:

● Novel Biotechnology Inc.: $100,000, testing a new manufacturing process that builds one of the key materials needed for production and research on mRNA vaccines, including those developed for COVID-19

Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022

The latest tranche of recipients of grants from the provinces’ Innovation Growth Fund — $900,000 for 12 projects — was announced this week.

The program provides up to $100,000 in non-repayable grants on a 50-50 cost-sharing basis for projects that develop and commercialize innovative products or processes.

Companies receiving grants include:

● Novel Biotechnology Inc.: $100,000, testing a new manufacturing process that builds one of the key materials needed for production and research on mRNA vaccines, including those developed for COVID-19

Digital media training studio gets $1.5M boost from province

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Digital media training studio gets $1.5M boost from province

Martin Cash 4 minute read Monday, Nov. 7, 2022

Manitoba’s interactive digital media industry is getting a major boost with the announcement of an extended reality training studio that will not only enhance training opportunities in a rapidly growing area but give the province a competitive edge in attracting new investment.

The province is providing $1.5 million over three years for the new 5,500 square-foot studio that will be built in the concourse area of 201 Portage Ave.

StudioLab XR — scheduled to open by the spring of 2023 — will primarily be a training facility but could be used for smaller commercial production and is expected to generate more than $3 million in revenue over its first three years.

Extended reality (called XR) is a term that includes augmented reality and virtual reality and is expected to grow into a $7 billion global industry in the next few years.

Monday, Nov. 7, 2022

Rebecca Harrison, founder, game designer and creative director of Flightyfelon Games. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)

Uphouse acquires Dooley PR to become one-stop agency

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Uphouse acquires Dooley PR to become one-stop agency

Martin Cash 4 minute read Monday, Nov. 7, 2022

Uphouse, one of the city’s growing ad agencies has acquired Dooley PR allowing them, they say, to better meet the communication and marketing needs of the modern world.

Principals from both firms said their clients were needing more of the services that each firm offered and agreed that a merger would allow them to better service them with the combination of their respective skill sets.

Alex Varricchio, co-owner of Uphouse said with the addition of Dooley, Uphouse may not become the largest agency in town but “it will now be among the largest” with about 30 employees in total after the deal closes Dec. 1.

“It will give us the opportunity to look at more national contracts,” Varricchio said. “Many of the national accounts want to see that there is a PR (public relations) piece. It’s not there with all agencies. Lots of marketers are required to live in the world of PR now. In the past they may not have had to as much.”

Monday, Nov. 7, 2022

Kiirsten May (from left) and Alex Varricchio, co-owners of UpHouse, with Adam Dooley and Stephanie Fung of Dooley PR & Marketing. (Supplied)

Women’s Entrepreneurship Day Organization to hold its first event

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Women’s Entrepreneurship Day Organization to hold its first event

Martin Cash 4 minute read Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022

Carla Devlin, the newly elected mayor of East St. Paul, knows a thing or two about juggling work and family life.

Devlin was just elected mayor of East St. Paul after a four year stint as a councillor, which happened to take place during the pandemic.

In addition to her part-time duties on the East St. Paul municipal council, she is also the CEO of her own construction company, Carrington Property Developments, a design, build and renovation company, as well as the mother of four children, the youngest of whom was in elementary school at the start of the pandemic.

She’s also the new Manitoba ambassador for Women’s Entrepreneurship Day Organization (WEDO), a global organization that will be holding its first event in Winnipeg on Nov. 18.

Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022

Supplied

Carrie Simpson, now based in Michigan, said the pandemic was a real eye-opener.

City ready for its close-up

Martin Cash 3 minute read Preview

City ready for its close-up

Martin Cash 3 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

The two-dozen strong Manitoba film industry contingent that blitzed Los Angeles this week established a strong beachhead with the film industry there and officials believe they will see results as early as this spring.

Flying to L.A. on WestJet’s inaugural direct flight from Winnipeg on Monday morning, the team, including Manitoba Sport, Culture and Heritage Minister Andrew Smith, capped off three days of meetings with a sit-down with 15 studio heads at the Motion Picture Association of America.

“There was more than $1 trillion in market cap in that room,” Smith said in a press conference in L.A. on Wednesday afternoon. “These were the top executives from all the big studios. They have all heard of Manitoba, they know where it is and they said they are looking forward to continuing to work here. The direct flight will help.”

Rod Bruinooge, head of Manitoba Film and Music, said the large contingent created a chance for the Manitoba film industry to generate some buzz in L.A.

Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

The film industry attracted about $365 million this past fiscal year and members of the industry are hoping it will grow to $1 billion in the next 10 years. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Manitoba could become a lithium hot spot

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Manitoba could become a lithium hot spot

Martin Cash 4 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022

Grid Metals, a Toronto-based mineral exploration company, is one of about a dozen junior mining companies active in one way or another in exploring for lithium in Manitoba right now.

Grid recently signed an agreement with the Tantalum Mining Corporation of Canada Limited (Tanco) to evaluate and potentially process lithium that may be extracted from Grid’s Donner Lake lithium property located about 45 minutes from Tanco’s lithium concentrator near Lac du Bonnet.

The fact that the federal government issued an announcement on Friday indicating it is tightening regulations on foreign state-owned entities (SOE) from owning rights to extract so-called “critical minerals,” is not expected to have any impact on Tanco’s operations.

In 2019, Tanco was acquired by the Sinomine Resource Group Co., Ltd., a large Chinese mining company whose shares trade on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange with assets around the world.

Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022

Inside the processing facility at the Tanco mine near Lac du Bonnet. (Sinomine Resource Group Co. Ltd.)

Province’s biotech sector shows impressive growth

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Province’s biotech sector shows impressive growth

Martin Cash 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 28, 2022

In just about every respect, the province’s biotech industry grew during the pandemic as the industry pivoted to address a public health emergency.

Bioscience Association of Manitoba (BAM) released some of the results of a survey done in 2021 at its annual meeting on Thursday, including employment up over 7,500, but total revenue declined a bit to $9.9 billion from $10.4 billion in 2019.

The sector grew in just about every other type of metric, with ag-biotech dragging down the total revenue likely because it had to deal with the depressed conditions caused by the 2021 drought that challenged the entire ag industry.

But it is the kind of pivoting Manitoba companies undertook to innovate and produce personal protective equipment and vaccine and therapeutics that BAM’s president Kim Kline, said, generated growth while so many other sectors were forced on their heels during the pandemic and now in the current economic environment.

Friday, Oct. 28, 2022

ALEX LUPUL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Kim Kline, president of Bioscience Association Manitoba.

Northern connectivity tied up in politics, red tape

Martin Cash 5 minute read Preview

Northern connectivity tied up in politics, red tape

Martin Cash 5 minute read Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

At the sixth annual Indigenous Connectivity Summit being held in Winnipeg this week, it was made clear that the ongoing frustrations that northern Manitoba First Nations experience in getting adequate high speed internet connectivity is no different than many other places in the country.

Mark Buell, director of Indigenous programs for Connect Humanity, one of the organizers of this week’s summit in Winnipeg (and a former Winnipegger), said First Nations across North America are often stuck on the wrong side of the digital divide that exists.

“It’s due to any number of reasons — geography, policies, access to capital,” said Buell. “But because Indigenous communities are generally remote with small populations, the federal policy environment makes it very difficult to get infrastructure and services built. Northern Manitoba is not unique in this regard.”

Many First Nation communities in Manitoba have to rely on notoriously slow satellite connections but even with less than adequate service in some cases there is a years-long waiting list to get hooked up because there is no excess capacity to expand.

Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Jason Neepin (left), CEO of Broadband Communications North, and David Kobliski, chair of the BCN board and the head of the development corporation at Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation.

Manufacturers leave $13 billion on the table

Martin Cash 5 minute read Preview

Manufacturers leave $13 billion on the table

Martin Cash 5 minute read Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022

The Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME) has put a number on all the hand-wringing going on about workers shortages — $13 billion.

That’s how much the current labour shortages is costing the industry across the country — in the last year alone. The CME came to that total extrapolating from a recent survey of its members on labour force issues.

It comes from lost orders because companies don’t have the workforce capacity to take on more work and from costs that have to be paid because of orders that are shipped late — again because of worker shortages — which totals about $7.2 billion.

Then there’s $5.4 billion from postponed or cancelled capital investment not made because of respective workforce shortages.

Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022

JEFF DE BOOY / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILE

Jill Knaggs, an official with CME Manitoba, said there is no reason to think that Manitoba manufacturers are not bearing a proportionate share of that $13 billion that’s been left on the table this past year because of worker shortages.

Supply chain issues put downward pressure on NFI shares

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Supply chain issues put downward pressure on NFI shares

Martin Cash 4 minute read Monday, Oct. 24, 2022

NFI Group continues to be held back by chronic parts shortages and has been forced to temporarily lay off about 200 people and halt new production for two weeks as it tries to finish off buses that are waiting for parts before they can be shipped.

A lot of the persistent delays in parts that got worse at the end of September and into October have to do with microprocessors and electrical parts.

The company, formerly New Flyer Industries, has to lower its financial forecasts for the quarter and has had to go back to its bankers once again to re-negotiate covenant agreements on its $1.25 billion in debt.

NFI shares were down close to 20 per cent on Monday.

Monday, Oct. 24, 2022

Even with all the troubles the company has been experiencing, NFI remains the market leader in North America, says CEO Paul Soubry. (Mike Sudoma / Winnipeg Free Press files)

529 Wellington opening restaurant at Portage and Main

Martin Cash 6 minute read Preview

529 Wellington opening restaurant at Portage and Main

Martin Cash 6 minute read Friday, Oct. 21, 2022

The concept has been aging for at least three years and is now finally ready to be made official.

529 Uptown, a sister restaurant to the iconic — and very successful — Winnipeg steakhouse, 529 Wellington, is going to open in the lobby of 201 Portage Ave. in the spring of 2023.

Doug Stephen, the CEO and owner of Wow Hospitality (which owns 529, Peasant Cookery and other Winnipeg eateries) and Rosanne Hill Blaisdell, the CEO of Regina-based Harvard Developments which owns 201 Portage, have been talking about it for about four years.

But the pandemic — obviously — and a serious health challenge that Stephen is now in the process of recovering from, kept stalling the project’s development.

Friday, Oct. 21, 2022

529 Uptown, a sister restaurant to the iconic — and very successful — Winnipeg steakhouse, 529 Wellington, is going to open in the lobby of 201 Portage Ave. in the spring of 2023.

Plans announced for a SMARTFARM — a digital agriculture accelerator to grow cutting-edge farm technology

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Plans announced for a SMARTFARM — a digital agriculture accelerator to grow cutting-edge farm technology

Martin Cash 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 21, 2022

A 5,500-acre farm just north of Winnipeg is going to be turned into a digital agricultural testing lab that will help Manitoba stay on the cutting edge of food productions technology for many years to come.

Funding of more than $8 million in capital – including $2.5 million from PrairiesCan — and in-kind support from private sectors operators was announced at the Agriculture Enlightened conference, organized by EMILI (Enterprise Machine Intelligence & Learning Initiative), a Manitoba artificial intelligence consortium that has been around for about five years.

EMILI has been working with Rick Rutherford, the owner of Rutherford Farms near Grosse Isle, Man. on projects for a few years already. He has enthusiastically embraced the technology project.

The important ag-tech implementation – called Innovation Farms Powered by Ag Expert – will turn Rutherford Farms into the largest commercial smart farm of its kind in the country.

Friday, Oct. 21, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Rick Rutherford (left) owner of Rutherford Farms near Grosse Isle with Jacqueline Keena, EMILI’s managing director and Ray Bouchard, the chairman of EMILI and the CEO of Enns Brothers.

Deal puts Indigenous training centre on path to offering certificates

Martin Cash 4 minute read Preview

Deal puts Indigenous training centre on path to offering certificates

Martin Cash 4 minute read Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022

Neeginan College of Applied Technology, the urban Indigenous education and training organization based in the old CP Rail station on Higgins Avenue, has been working with Manitoba Institute of Trades and Technology (MITT) for many years.

On Wednesday, the two schools signed an official partnership agreement that could lead to the development of new course curriculum as well as MITT providing accreditation for courses that Neeginan delivers.

Although Neeginan has been around for about 30 years, it does not have the status to allow it to grant certificates or diplomas or degrees on its own.

However, through partnerships such as the one it has had with MITT, it can deliver certain training programs and provide provincially recognized certification for graduating students. It also had similar partnerships with other degree-granting institutions.

Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Ray Karasevich, president of the Manitoba Institute of Trades and Technology, and Kevin Chief, chairman of the Centre for Aboriginal Human Resource Development, sign a deal that opens the door to training more Indigenous people for well-paying jobs in industrial painting, glass work and insurance.