Ryan Thorpe

Ryan Thorpe

Reporter

Ryan Thorpe likes the pace of daily news, the feeling of a broadsheet in his hands and the stress of never-ending deadlines hanging over his head. He believes journalism isn’t a career, but a calling; that rather than being something you do, a journalist is something you are.

He graduated top of his class from Niagara College’s journalism program in 2017. As a student reporter, he picked up an Ontario Community Newspaper Awards nomination for a story on food bank use in southern Ontario. He also served as editor on an investigative project into the state of student mental health on post-secondary campuses, which won a 2017 Emerge Media Award.

Ryan is a former intern at The Hamilton Spectator, where he co-authored a six-week investigative report on drug use in the city’s high schools. Afterwards he landed a summer internship at the Free Press in June 2017. Since then, he’s managed to find a way to stick around the newspaper.

Recent articles of Ryan Thorpe

‘Troubling patterns’: traffic infrastructure contracts keep city transportation division in spotlight

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‘Troubling patterns’: traffic infrastructure contracts keep city transportation division in spotlight

Ryan Thorpe 6 minute read Tuesday, Sep. 13, 2022

Questions are being raised on how the City of Winnipeg handles tenders for traffic infrastructure, following a Free Press analysis of underground wiring contracts dating back more than a decade.

A single local construction firm was awarded the annual contract over a period of 14 years — a stretch in which the city only received a second bid on the work on two occasions.

During a six-year stretch (2010-15) — the only ones for which the municipal government has proactively released financial records for — the price tag for the work spiked after the contract was awarded, coming in 73 per cent higher annually than projected by the winning bid.

Barry Prentice, director of the University of Manitoba Transport Institute, said the city’s pattern of awarding significant contracts without receiving multiple bids is concerning, as are the discrepancies between the winning bids and the final price tag for 2010-15.

Tuesday, Sep. 13, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Questions are being raised on how the City of Winnipeg handles tenders for traffic infrastructure, following a Free Press analysis of underground wiring contracts dating back more than a decade.

Restorative justice proponents point to alternative way

Ryan Thorpe 25 minute read Preview

Restorative justice proponents point to alternative way

Ryan Thorpe 25 minute read Friday, Sep. 9, 2022

The volunteers stand around the old storefront at 605 Main St. holding cardboard boxes filled with supplies — fresh fruit, bottles of water and jugs of juice, plastic containers into which used needles can be safely disposed — when there’s a knock at the door.

Someone unlocks it and lets in a woman off the street. She wanders over to a nearby table stacked high with folded clothing and looks through what’s on offer. Like everything else here, the clothing is free for anyone who needs it.

Off in the corner, talking energetically, is educator and activist Mitch Bourbonniere, who organizes a community walk out of this storefront every Tuesday and Thursday. Rain or shine, sleet or snow, they don’t miss a day — week in week out, month after month, year after year.

“There’s no funding for this,” Bourbonniere says, “we just do it.”

Friday, Sep. 9, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Delivering food, water and clothing is the byproduct — delivering joy, empathy and hope is the true gift.

City auditor says changes to traffic infrastructure lack paper trail

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City auditor says changes to traffic infrastructure lack paper trail

Ryan Thorpe 5 minute read Thursday, Sep. 8, 2022

A report into allegations of financial mismanagement in the City of Winnipeg’s transportation division found that staff lacked written documentation to justify mass changes to traffic infrastructure in Winnipeg.

City auditor Bryan Mansky also determined the department still does not have an asset management plan — more than a decade after a 2010 audit of the department highlighted that as cause for concern.

“The traffic signals branch lacks full documentation to support decisions on changes to the existing intersection signal infrastructure,” Mansky wrote. The report, which was made public Thursday, will be presented to the city’s executive policy committee next week.

“The traffic signals branch has not developed asset management plans for intersection signal infrastructure. The intent of an asset management plan is to outline how infrastructure investment can be directed to minimize life cycle costs… while delivering an expected level of service.”

Thursday, Sep. 8, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

The investigation into the traffic signals branch was triggered by a Free Press series – Red Light, Green Light, No Oversight – in March that was based on the work of independent researcher Christian Sweryda.

High processing fees for freedom of information requests slammed

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High processing fees for freedom of information requests slammed

Ryan Thorpe 5 minute read Monday, Aug. 8, 2022

Manitoba Justice wants nearly $32,000 to process three freedom of information requests seeking Crown documents related to a secret RCMP investigation into the scandal-plagued administration of Winnipeg mayor Sam Katz.

Kevin Walby, access to information specialist and associate professor in the department of criminal justice at the University of Winnipeg, called the fee requests “completely outrageous.”

“It’s political, and FIPPA (Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act) never should be… I think it’s a political strategy of government agencies to block access to the public. It really goes against the spirit of freedom of information law, and I’m fairly certain it goes against the letter of the law, too,” Walby said.

In May, the Free Press revealed the existence of RCMP Project Dioxide: a criminal probe into a string of city hall real estate transactions, as well as the construction of four Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service stations by Shindico Realty, and an associated, aborted land swap.

Monday, Aug. 8, 2022

'This is an example of a government actively trying to hide information from the public,' said NDP MLA Nahanni Fontaine. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Mission accomplished

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Mission accomplished

Ryan Thorpe 6 minute read Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022

William “Bill” Hutton led a life dedicated to others.

Born in Toronto on Jan. 30, 1929, his childhood during the Great Depression impacted his politics and worldview, leaving him with a lifelong concern for the underdog – from a 15-year-old couch-surfing following a family breakdown; to a man leaving prison with nowhere to go; to a ballet company in Havana struggling to find dance slippers.

His father, who worked for the Bell phone company, would take Bill and his siblings to see the soup kitchens downtown in an effort to make them realize that times were tough for many people, and they were fortunate to have a father with a good job.

“One of the side-effects of growing up during the depression was the realization that people have to help each other out. You have to work together. All his life, he was trying to make things just a little better,” said his son, John Hutton.

Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022

Leaked documents reveal police HQ project wasn't financially sound when construction began

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Leaked documents reveal police HQ project wasn't financially sound when construction began

Ryan Thorpe 16 minute read Friday, Jul. 8, 2022

The temperature hovered just below freezing on Jan. 15, 2010, when 11 people arrived at city hall for a Saturday meeting in the boardroom of then-chief administrative officer Phil Sheegl to discuss the downtown Winnipeg Police Service headquarters construction project.

The meeting was consequential for the controversial job, which sparked multiple audits, allegations of kickbacks and corruption, calls for a public inquiry and a five-year RCMP investigation that closed without criminal charges.

In the years since police moved into the new downtown HQ on Smith Street in 2014, the high-profile controversy has largely focused on Caspian Construction — the main building firm — and its various sub-contractors, who have never commented publicly.

The City of Winnipeg alleges it was defrauded by the project’s construction contractors and design team through a scheme of inflated and fabricated invoices — allegations that remain before Manitoba’s civil court.

Friday, Jul. 8, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
Police (WPS) headquarters in Winnipeg at the corner of St Mary and Smith.

Eight years later, key “non-existent” police HQ meeting minutes magically appear

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Eight years later, key “non-existent” police HQ meeting minutes magically appear

Ryan Thorpe 5 minute read Thursday, Jul. 7, 2022

It took significantly longer than a minute for key meeting minutes relating to the controversial Winnipeg Police Headquarters construction project to emerge.

More than 4.2 million of them, in fact.

The Free Press has obtained copies of meeting records from the project’s oversight committee eight years after city staff told both internal and external auditors that the documents didn’t exist.

City council ordered two external audits in 2013 after learning the expected price tag to transform the downtown Canada Post warehouse into a new home for the city’s police department had skyrocketed.

Thursday, Jul. 7, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
The Winnipeg Police Service headquarters, where an individual doused himself in flammable liquid and attempted to light himself on fire, in Winnipeg on Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. For —- story. Winnipeg Free Press 2022.

Festivals fill the streets

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Festivals fill the streets

Ryan Thorpe 4 minute read Saturday, Jun. 25, 2022

Street festivals made a triumphant return to Winnipeg this weekend as communities came together once more to move toward a post-pandemic city.

The annual Art City parade had a sizeable turnout and brought smiles to the faces of children and adults alike, with participants dressed in costumes and holding placards aloft while manoeuvring floats down the streets of West Broadway.

Josh Ruth, Art City’s managing director, said the annual parade — which has been on hiatus during the COVID-19 pandemic — is the organization’s flagship event.

“The parade goes back to almost the beginning of Art City. The folks involved at the time thought, ‘We have all this great art, great collaboration, great community that exists inside our doors, why not take it out into the street?’” Ruth said.

Saturday, Jun. 25, 2022

Participants of the Art City Parade pull a giant fruit salad bowl at the start of the parade on Saturday. (Ethan Cairns / Winnipeg Free Press)

Email trail intertwines city, real estate company on police HQ project

Ryan Thorpe 7 minute read Preview

Email trail intertwines city, real estate company on police HQ project

Ryan Thorpe 7 minute read Friday, Jun. 24, 2022

A trail of emails obtained by the Free Press provides fresh insight into the close and collaborative relationship between local development firm Shindico and Winnipeg city hall during the administration of former mayor Sam Katz.

The emails reveal backchannel communication regarding several real estate projects, including a case where a specific city councillor was identified as an obstacle.

They show Phil Sheegl, a senior member of the public service and a close ally of Katz, referring to himself and Shindico as a joint entity.

They detail the existence of a meeting for three city employees at the home of Sandy Shindleman, co-owner of Shindico, to discuss buying the downtown Canada Post building that was later renovated into Winnipeg Police Service headquarters.

Friday, Jun. 24, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

The Winnipeg Police Service headquarters

Design engineer repeatedly told city officials police behind HQ’s rising costs, delays

Ryan Thorpe 8 minute read Preview

Design engineer repeatedly told city officials police behind HQ’s rising costs, delays

Ryan Thorpe 8 minute read Friday, Jun. 10, 2022

A key player in the construction of Winnipeg’s downtown police headquarters repeatedly raised concerns with senior city administration about design changes pushed by the police service causing significant cost overruns and schedule delays.

Internal project correspondence newly obtained by the Free Press reveals the degree of frustration that was mounting for Peter Chang and the design firm Adjeleian Allen Rubeli Ltd., on the construction project.

On at least two occasions, Chang threatened to walk away from the job, complaining his firm had been mistreated by the city and police service. On another occasion, he accused the city of instructing him to censor a progress report critical of the Winnipeg Police Service.

The correspondence sheds new light on steps taken by city hall to limit the exposure of the police service in the controversial capital project.

Friday, Jun. 10, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
The Winnipeg Police Services headquarters building in Winnipeg. The defendants are alleged to have fabricated and inflated invoices and pushed change orders to drive up construction costs.

Audits into construction job concerns repeatedly produced recommendations that were sometimes not implemented

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Audits into construction job concerns repeatedly produced recommendations that were sometimes not implemented

Ryan Thorpe 6 minute read Friday, Jun. 3, 2022

Unexpected cost overruns, significant schedule delays, poor project planning, bad management and haphazard record keeping.

Those were the findings of a series of audits into municipal capital projects in the years leading up to the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters controversy.

The WPS HQ project sparked an RCMP criminal investigation, allegations of kickbacks and corruption and ongoing civil litigation launched by the City of Winnipeg.

But in order to understand what went wrong — and why — on the controversial job, it must be placed into proper context, which requires a look back at the over-budget capital projects that preceded it.

Friday, Jun. 3, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
When the external audit into the WPS HQ construction project was finalized in 2014, the report noted the 1992 draft manual on capital project administration was still in place.

Document shows police not innocent in HQ cost overruns

Ryan Thorpe 7 minute read Preview

Document shows police not innocent in HQ cost overruns

Ryan Thorpe 7 minute read Thursday, Jun. 2, 2022

One year before the completion of the controversial downtown police headquarters project, then-Winnipeg Police Service chief Devon Clunis told a news conference at city hall the force wasn’t responsible for runaway construction costs.

Clunis was armed with a newly released audit, which he and city councillors said absolved the WPS of responsibility for the skyrocketing price tag.

“There may have been a perception that the police service was doing things to drive up the cost and this audit says, clearly, this is not the case,” Clunis said on July 15, 2014.

But an unreleased draft of the audit report obtained by the Free Press tells a different story.

Thursday, Jun. 2, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
The Winnipeg Police Services headquarters building in Winnipeg.

Volunteers build welcoming beds for Ukrainian refugee children

Ryan Thorpe 4 minute read Preview

Volunteers build welcoming beds for Ukrainian refugee children

Ryan Thorpe 4 minute read Friday, May. 27, 2022

Thanks to the work of some dedicated volunteers, 60 newly arrived children from war-torn Ukraine now have a place to rest their heads at night in Winnipeg.

The charitable organization Sleep in Heavenly Peace Winnipeg (SHPW) brought together more than 50 volunteers on Saturday to build twin-size beds for Ukrainian families in need.

“Giving a much-needed item, like a bed, to a child is an easy concept to get behind. But what also appeals to me is that it involves community coming together to make that happen,” said SHPW president Jim Thiessen.

“I believe it takes community to make a better community. We had over 50 volunteers show up. We started at 10:15 a.m. and by noon we’re done.”

Friday, May. 27, 2022

Anton Khomenko (left) and Alex Tarasov, who recently arrived in Winnipeg from Ukraine, help build beds during the annual Beds For Kids event. (Daniel Crump / Winnipeg Free Press)

Missing: active pathways, millions to pay for them

Ryan Thorpe 6 minute read Preview

Missing: active pathways, millions to pay for them

Ryan Thorpe 6 minute read Friday, May. 20, 2022

On paper, it seems like a pair of simple projects that could easily be done to move Winnipeg’s active transportation agenda forward.

But like most things in the city, what is budgeted and what actually happens are two different things.

In the case of the bike-lane and multi-use path projects, the cost of which total $2.2 million and were supposed to be completed last year, no one can clearly explain why the work wasn’t done. Or where the money went.

The University Crescent road reconstruction project was launched with Phase 1 of construction beginning in 2021 and Phase 2 scheduled for this year.

Friday, May. 20, 2022

DANIEL CRUMP / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS The underpass on Keewatin Street in Winnipeg. There was $1.3 million earmarked for a multi-use path at this location, at the underpass, but when the street was rebuilt, no active transportation infrastructure was added.

City wants to add 12 defendants now, maybe more later, to police HQ lawsuit

Ryan Thorpe 4 minute read Preview

City wants to add 12 defendants now, maybe more later, to police HQ lawsuit

Ryan Thorpe 4 minute read Wednesday, May. 18, 2022

The City of Winnipeg wants to sue more people and companies connected to the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters construction project, and Mayor Brian Bowman says there could be more to come after that.

In a May 4 notice of motion, the city asked Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench Chief Justice Glenn Joyal for leave in order to amend its statement of claim in the lawsuit to add 12 additional parties.

A hearing in the case, which the city launched in January 2020 against Caspian Construction and dozens of other defendants connected to the over-budget capital project, is scheduled for May 31.

Joyal has recused himself as trial judge in the case, citing a “spectre” of bias that could hang over his involvement after he ruled in March that Phil Sheegl, the city’s top bureaucrat from May 2011 to October 2013, accepted a bribe in connection with the project.

Wednesday, May. 18, 2022

JOE BRYKSA / FREE PRESS FILES
The City of Winnipeg wants to sue more people and companies connected to the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters construction project

Judge steps away from civil trial over police HQ project

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Judge steps away from civil trial over police HQ project

Ryan Thorpe 5 minute read Tuesday, May. 17, 2022

Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench Chief Justice Glenn Joyal has decided not to hear an upcoming civil trial arising from the controversial Winnipeg Police Service headquarters construction project, citing the “spectre” of bias.

The lawsuit was launched by the City of Winnipeg in January 2020, roughly one month after Manitoba RCMP closed Project Dalton — the multi-year, multimillion-dollar fraud investigation into the over-budget project — without criminal charges.

The defendants named in the suit are former City of Winnipeg chief administrative officer Phil Sheegl, various contractors and consultants connected to the job and Caspian Construction, the firm hired to build the WPS HQ.

In a letter dated May 10th obtained by the Free Press, Joyal notified the lawyers on the case that he planned to recuse himself.

Tuesday, May. 17, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
Chief Justice Glenn Joyal has decided not to hear an upcoming civil trial arising from the controversial Winnipeg Police Service headquarters construction project, citing the “spectre” of bias.

A decade of dubious deals, disquieting dollars

Ryan Thorpe 16 minute read Preview

A decade of dubious deals, disquieting dollars

Ryan Thorpe 16 minute read Friday, May. 13, 2022

Controversy was a frequent visitor to city hall during the administration of Sam Katz, who served as Winnipeg’s mayor from 2004 to 2014.

In recent years, the spotlight has focused on one: the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters construction project.

That’s because in December 2014 — one month after Katz left office — the RCMP raided Caspian Construction, the firm awarded a single-sourced contract on the over-budget job.

The raid revealed the existence of RCMP Project Dalton, the multi-year, multimillion-dollar fraud investigation into the construction project.

Friday, May. 13, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS RCMP documents used to acquire a search warrant at Caspian Construction, the company involved in the reconstruction of the Winnipeg Police headquarters photographed Monday, February 29, 2016.

Mayor wasn’t aware of second RCMP probe into Katz-era deals

Ryan Thorpe 3 minute read Preview

Mayor wasn’t aware of second RCMP probe into Katz-era deals

Ryan Thorpe 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 11, 2022

Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman is renewing his call for a public inquiry into controversial capital projects and real estate deals during the Katz-Sheegl era at city hall after the existence of a second, parallel RCMP probe has come to light.

On Tuesday, the Free Press revealed the existence of RCMP Project Dioxide — a previously undisclosed investigation into a string of real estate deals and an over-budget capital project during the administration — 2004-2014 — of former mayor Sam Katz.

Project Dioxide ran parallel to RCMP Project Dalton, the multi-year, multimillion-dollar fraud investigation into the construction of the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters.

On Wednesday, Jeremy Davis, a spokesman for Bowman, said the mayor had not been aware of the existence of RCMP Project Dioxide prior to the Free Press report.

Wednesday, May. 11, 2022

BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
Pictured former mayor Sam Katz, right, and Phil Sheegl. Project Dioxide ran parallel to RCMP Project Dalton, the multi-year, multimillion-dollar fraud investigation into the construction of the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters.

RCMP put Katz-era deals under secret microscope

Ryan Thorpe 8 minute read Preview

RCMP put Katz-era deals under secret microscope

Ryan Thorpe 8 minute read Tuesday, May. 10, 2022

The discovery of a secret police investigation into a string of municipal real estate deals and a controversial capital project sheds new light on the scope of suspected criminal activity at Winnipeg city hall during the Katz-Sheegl era.

The Free Press has uncovered evidence of an undisclosed criminal probe, which ran alongside Project Dalton, the RCMP’s multi-year, multimillion-dollar fraud investigation into the construction of the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters.

Project Dioxide, the code name given to the parallel RCMP investigation, launched in the fall of 2014, but was never formally announced or revealed to the public.

It investigated a series of real estate transactions during the administration of Mayor Sam Katz (2004-2014), as well as the construction of four fire-paramedic stations by Shindico Realty and an associated, aborted land swap.

Tuesday, May. 10, 2022

Former mayor Sam Katz (Boris Minkevich / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Personal reflections during holy season

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Personal reflections during holy season

Ryan Thorpe 4 minute read Monday, Apr. 18, 2022

Church bells clanged throughout Winnipeg Sunday morning, welcoming parishioners to the first in-person Easter services held in the city since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic more than two years ago.

While some churches chose to keep their doors shuttered and stream their services online, others welcomed the faithful back inside, inviting them to gather together once more on the holiest day of the Christian liturgical calendar.

Earlier in the week, the possibility of in-person Easter services seemed threatened for a third consecutive year. This time, however, the culprit wasn’t pandemic public health restrictions, but an early spring snowstorm Environment Canada warned could be historic in its devastation.

Snow did indeed descend upon Winnipeg, but not in the quantity predicted by the meteorologists, clearing the way for in-person Easter services to go ahead as planned.

Monday, Apr. 18, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Father Sam Argenziano greets his parishioners as they participate in Easter mass at Holy Rosary Church on River Avenue on Easter Sunday.

Manitoba’s most powerful chief accused of sexual assault

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Manitoba’s most powerful chief accused of sexual assault

Ryan Thorpe 4 minute read Thursday, Mar. 17, 2022

A woman in a senior leadership position at the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs has accused Grand Chief Arlen Dumas — the most powerful Indigenous leader in the province — of sexual assault.

A formal criminal complaint has been filed with the Winnipeg Police Service sex crimes unit and the assembly’s executive council of chiefs was notified about the allegation Monday.

Police spokeswoman Const. Dani McKinnon confirmed Thursday that a complaint had been received and an incident number was generated.

McKinnon said police could not reveal information about the accuser or accused, or the details of the allegation.

Thursday, Mar. 17, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Arlen Dumas.

Public works rejects mismanagement allegations

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Public works rejects mismanagement allegations

Ryan Thorpe 3 minute read Thursday, Mar. 10, 2022

Winnipeg’s public works department responded publicly for the first time Thursday to allegations of financial mismanagement within the traffic signals branch at a special meeting of the city’s finance committee.

Chairman Scott Gillingham (St. James) called the session in response to the recent Free Press investigative series Red Light, Green Light, No Oversight, based on the findings of independent traffic researcher Christian Sweryda.

Public works director Jim Berezowsky disputed allegations his department has engaged in widespread patterns of financial mismanagement and wasteful construction practices dating back more than a decade.

“We believe there is an explanation for each and every Google picture,” Berezowsky said, referring to Sweryda’s research, the result of hundreds of hours spent analyzing Google Street View images and cataloguing changes to traffic infrastructure in Winnipeg.

Thursday, Mar. 10, 2022

Rush hour traffic sits at a red light on Bishop Grandin Boulevard. (Mike Sudoma / Free Press files)

Winnipeg’s photo-enforcement system was set up for profit rather than protection, critics charge

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Winnipeg’s photo-enforcement system was set up for profit rather than protection, critics charge

Ryan Thorpe 12 minute read Friday, Feb. 25, 2022

If a car is going faster than a car going slower, does the car going faster need more time to stop than the car going slower?

For years, that was the question independent researcher Christian Sweryda would ask the class when he was invited to guest lecture at universities in Winnipeg on traffic issues.

Then he would tell everyone who thought the faster car needed more time to stop to raise their hand.

“The whole class would put their hands up, thinking: ‘What’s the catch?’” Sweryda says.

Friday, Feb. 25, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Winnipegger’s effort to replace missing school area traffic signs thwarted by city department’s couldn’t-care-less attitude

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Winnipegger’s effort to replace missing school area traffic signs thwarted by city department’s couldn’t-care-less attitude

Ryan Thorpe 7 minute read Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022

It was sometime in 2011 when independent researcher and traffic-safety activist Christian Sweryda started to notice locations where school-zone signs were missing in Winnipeg.

He began to count the places where they should have been installed. When his list hit 30, he contacted the transportation division of the public works department to flag the issue.

Sweryda said based on how many signs were missing just in his area, there were likely hundreds more around the city. He suggested someone do an inventory.

Someone in the department told Sweryda it would not do a count, but would replace missing signs on a case-by-case basis. They told him to stop calling and instead contact 311.

Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022

TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

30km/h school zone speed limit sign on Grosvernor Avenue near Wilton Street, Thursday, October 18, 2018.