Chiefs draw attention to lack of action on Jordan’s Principle

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WINNIPEG - On the sixth anniversary of a little boy's death, First Nations parents and leaders are calling for action on Jordan’s Principle, a motion to ensure children get immediate health services and governments wrangle over who will pay later.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 02/02/2011 (4212 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

WINNIPEG – On the sixth anniversary of a little boy’s death, First Nations parents and leaders are calling for action on Jordan’s Principle, a motion to ensure children get immediate health services and governments wrangle over who will pay later.

The motion is named for Jordan Anderson, a little boy from Norway House with severe medical needs. Jordan’s parents had to give him up to Child and Family Services so he could get care in Winnipeg. He lived in hospital, far from friends or family, even though a medically approved foster family awaited him.

Federal and provincial representatives argued for almost three years about who would cover the costs of his care, and Jordan never left the hospital. He was five when he died Feb. 2, 2005.

Today, the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs held a press conference to keep Jordan’s story alive and hold governments accountable for kids living on reserves now.

In September 2008, the governments of Manitoba and Canada announced they would form a bilateral committee to ensure Jordan’s Principle was implemented. Other provinces have said they support it, too, but Jordan’s Principle has never been fully implemented it, say the Manitoba chiefs.

They’re calling on all Manitobans to lobby their MPs and MLAs to make sure children on First Nations receive the care they need.

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