If you're looking forward to skating on the Assiniboine River at The Forks, we have some bad news: Friday’s snowfall will make you wait a little longer.

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This article was published 3/1/2014 (3101 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Freezing overnight temperatures created circular ice formations on the Assiniboine River in November.

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Freezing overnight temperatures created circular ice formations on the Assiniboine River in November.

If you're looking forward to skating on the Assiniboine River at The Forks, we have some bad news: Friday’s snowfall will make you wait a little longer.

Despite a month of subzero temperatures, the ice on the Assiniboine River isn’t thick enough to be deemed safe to support people, officals with The Forks said Friday. The delay was initially caused by higher water velocity underneath the ice.

Workers at the Forks were hoping to open up a smaller skating section in the frozen boat port for a small hockey rink -- but now crews have to wait until it stops snowing to shovel the rink area again.

Dave Pancoe, special projects manager at the Forks, said they have been testing the ice and started construction, but it’s been slow.

"First we test the ice, then we start shovelling it. Eventually after we start, we’ll pour water on top until it’s thicker," Pancoe said. "Once it’s smooth and ready, we’ll scrape the river with a zamboni."

The primary cause of open ice around the Forks is water flowing from the Souris and Qu’Appelle river systems.