August 23, 2019

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Dire forecast, new things and looking ahead to Saturday: Politics 204 for May 13


Quote of the day

  • The dried up bed at O.C. Fisher Lake Wednesday in San Angelo, Texas.

    The dried up bed at O.C. Fisher Lake Wednesday in San Angelo, Texas.

    “We're heading toward a future that we're not ready for, socially, environmentally and economically. This is not hyperbole. Our kids' future is not only going to be radically different, but it will be a challenging future. This will be a very difficult place to live, in that kind of heat." -- Ian Mauro, an associate professor of geography and filmmaker at the University of Winnipeg and a co-director of the Prairie Climate Centre, also based in the Manitoba capital.

Some new things

  • Winnipeg Transit's Bjorn Radstrom (centre, seen above in May), spoke to the inquiry on land expropriations for the southwest transit corridor. (BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Files)

    Winnipeg Transit's Bjorn Radstrom (centre, seen above in May), spoke to the inquiry on land expropriations for the southwest transit corridor.

    New stage: A multi-national firm has been chosen to head up a consortium that will design, build and maintain the second stage of the southwest transit corridor. Winnipeg city hall announced this morning that the Plenary Roads Winnipeg consortium beat out two other groups to construct the $587-million transit corridor and Pembina Highway underpass project.
  • New hearing: A controversial garden supply company is getting a second chance to make its case it should be allowed to operate a compost site opposite the Brady landfill. A new hearing has been ordered in the case of the RM of Macdonald versus Samborski Garden Supplies, after the presiding judge was persuaded new evidence warrants a reconsideration of her decision to approve an injunction against the company.
  • New liquor board: A former Tory leader, a former Conservative MLA, and a defeated candidate are among the people Crown Services Minister Ron Schuler has appointed to the Manitoba Liquor and Lotteries board. The business-heavy board includes five men and four women, one of the most gender-balanced government appointments so far in the young administration.

Looking ahead to Saturday

  • Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman

    Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman

    Looking for contrast: If Premier Brian Pallister wants to ensure that he differentiates his new government from predecessors, he might start by helping the City of Winnipeg develop new streams of revenue to relieve the burden on property taxpayers. Dan Lett weighs in.
  • Looking for help: The question of how to accommodate the needs of different prime ministerial spouses has never been an issue in Canada, until now. Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau’s request for extra staff to help her with her demanding schedule has set off a round of criticism from critics. It would be more productive, however, if the parties agreed to come up with a solution that provides opportunities for political spouses so they can make contributions equal to their abilities and ambitions. That’s our editorial.

In case you missed it

  • Winnipeg South MP Terry Duguid (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press files)

    Winnipeg South MP Terry Duguid

    EI changes: Winnipeg Liberal MP Terry Duguid has been tasked with helping to cut down wait times for Canadians trying to access employment insurance. Duguid and Nova Scotia MP Rodger Cuzner will spend the next two months holding consultations across the country, as well as studying how the United Kingdom and Australia improved their systems. They will report back to Employment Minister MaryAnn Mihychuk and Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos in the fall.
  • MTS AGM: Despite any grumblings of dissatisfaction or concern that might be heard on the street about the proposed $3.9-billion acquisition of MTS by BCE, there wasn’t a peep of that at MTS’s annual meeting in Winnipeg on Thursday.
  • Ghomeshi aftermath: How does the feminist PM feel about publicly funded entities’ failure to protect women from sexual assault? That’s our editorial this morning.

Today in history

  • One of the Winnipeg Strike leaders, Roger Bray, addresses the pro-labour masses in Victoria Park in June 1919. Today in 1919, the strike vote was tallied. (Winnipeg Free Press)

    One of the Winnipeg Strike leaders, Roger Bray, addresses the pro-labour masses in Victoria Park in June 1919. Today in 1919, the strike vote was tallied.

    Strike: Today in 1919, the votes were tallied in support of a general strike. Winnipeg’s General Strike began with workers walking off the job on May 15 and it lasted until June 25. It is considered one of the biggest general strikes in Canadian history.

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