June 5, 2020

Winnipeg
10° C, A few clouds

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Free Press Head Start for May 22


COVID-19 crisis

  • Splash pads could soon be open again as the province lifts restrictions on gatherings in public places. (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press FIles)

    Splash pads could soon be open again as the province lifts restrictions on gatherings in public places.

    Group gathering limits: Public gatherings of 25 people indoors and 50 outdoors are allowed in Manitoba starting today. Meanwhile, Premier Brian Pallister announced Thursday that Phase 2 of his government’s reopening plans will include nearly everything except casinos, theatres, amusement parks, and big concert and sports venues. Carol Sanders reports.
  • PM under pressure: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will be under pressure today to explain how Ottawa will help provinces increase COVID-19 testing as the country begins to reopen. The Canadian Press reports.
  • Testing sewage for sickness: Researchers in Canada are starting to look at testing wastewater for signs of the coronavirus, as several other countries have done. The Canadian Press reports.
  • Unusual Ramadan nears end: Local Muslims are preparing to celebrate Eid, which marks the end of Ramadan fasting at sundown on Saturday. It has been a trying month for observant Muslims, who have been unable to break their fast with extended family and friends each night because of pandemic restrictions. Brenda Suderman reports.
  • Repair shops still rolling: The Free Press spoke with auto repair shops about how they have been affected by the pandemic. Willy Williamson reports.

Weather

  • Your forecast: A mix of sun and cloud with a 30 per cent chance of showers in the mid-afternoon, a high of 27 C, humidex of 29 and wind from the south at 20 km/h increasing to 30 km/h early this afternoon.

Pandemic and sports

  • Winnipeg Jets right wing Blake Wheeler and teammates celebrate a goal in December 2019. (Andy Clayton-King / The Associated Press Files)

    Winnipeg Jets right wing Blake Wheeler and teammates celebrate a goal in December 2019.

    NHL playoff proposal: The executive board of the NHL Players' Association's was voting on a 24-team playoff proposal as the return-to-play format last night, a source told The Associated Press. Results of the vote could be in as soon as tonight.
  • ‘Sad reality’: In his latest column, Jeff Hamilton says drastic changes are needed if the CFL is going to survive the pandemic.
  • Slow return to sports: The province has suggested organized sports can resume as part of its next phase of reopening, but it could be weeks before people are playing. Jason Bell reports.

In case you missed it

  • The Canadian flag and the UN flag are shown on the sleeve of a Canadian soldier's uniform.  (Lars Hagberg / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES)

    The Canadian flag and the UN flag are shown on the sleeve of a Canadian soldier's uniform.

    Lowest peacekeeping levels: Canada's contribution to peacekeeping is at its lowest level since at least 1956, even as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau continues to push for a seat on the United Nations Security Council. Canada had 46 peacekeepers deployed overseas at the end of February, before the pandemic hit the country hard, down from 167 deployed a year earlier. The Canadian Press reports.
  • Parker lands project: A city committee again rejected the Parker lands development proposal on Thursday. The city was found in contempt of a court order last summer because it considered the proposal through a bylaw process instead of the policy-based one a judge had ordered council to follow. Joyanne Pursaga reports.

On this date

  • On May 22, 1941: The Winnipeg Free Press reported that Nazi air invaders had gained two footholds on Crete and full control of the island, leaving British forces there without an airdrome. In North Africa, Britain's R.A.F. struck at German concentrations and transport columns in Libya. Britain warned the Vichy government in France that if it continued to collaborate with Nazi Germany, then British forces would strike the enemy wherever he might be found, whether in occupied or unoccupied territory. In Syria, an entire French regiment was believed to have deserted. Two young Manitoba farmers hopped aboard a freight train to make it to Winnipeg so they could enlist and join the fight in Europe.

Today's front page

  • Get the full story: Read today's e-edition of the Winnipeg Free Press

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