November 17, 2018

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Jets have mini-hospital close to ice

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 27/3/2012 (2426 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Ever wonder how a player can get high-sticked in the face, lose a few litres of blood on the ice and then be back on the bench a few shifts later?

It's all due to the magic that occurs in the medical room at the MTS Centre. The doctors on call at Winnipeg Jets games are among the best in their fields and they essentially have a mini-hospital at their disposal to help get players back in the game if they need to get stitched up or even save their lives in the event of a major injury.

Jetcetera was given a tour of the medical room from Dr. Peter MacDonald - the man who once reattached Teemu Selanne's achilles tendon - and even had Jets forward Jim Slater, um, drop his pants to show off a "badge of honour" stitch job after he had his leg cut open by a skate earlier this season.

Former NHLer Ted Irvine, now a Jets analyst, says medical treatment has come a long way from the 1960s and '70s. Back then, it wasn't uncommon to treat pain with a six-pack of beer.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 27/3/2012 (2426 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Dr Peter MacDonald, Jets' physician, poses in the team's medical room at the MTS Centre.

PHIL HOSSACK / WINIPEG FREE PRESS

Dr Peter MacDonald, Jets' physician, poses in the team's medical room at the MTS Centre.

Ever wonder how a player can get high-sticked in the face, lose a few litres of blood on the ice and then be back on the bench a few shifts later?

It's all due to the magic that occurs in the medical room at the MTS Centre. The doctors on call at Winnipeg Jets games are among the best in their fields and they essentially have a mini-hospital at their disposal to help get players back in the game if they need to get stitched up or even save their lives in the event of a major injury.

Jetcetera was given a tour of the medical room from Dr. Peter MacDonald - the man who once reattached Teemu Selanne's achilles tendon - and even had Jets forward Jim Slater, um, drop his pants to show off a "badge of honour" stitch job after he had his leg cut open by a skate earlier this season.

Former NHLer Ted Irvine, now a Jets analyst, says medical treatment has come a long way from the 1960s and '70s. Back then, it wasn't uncommon to treat pain with a six-pack of beer.

geoff.kirbyson@freepress.mb.ca

 There are some nasty injuries detailed in the video, so viewer discretion is advised.

Watch below.

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