The Winnipeg Jets would like to reassure their fans that they will not have to pay any additional fees for tickets as the team leads the charge into the digital age.

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Jim Ludlow, president and CEO of True North Sports & Entertainment

MELISSA TAIT / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Jim Ludlow, president and CEO of True North Sports & Entertainment

The Winnipeg Jets would like to reassure their fans that they will not have to pay any additional fees for tickets as the team leads the charge into the digital age.

Jim Ludlow, president and CEO of True North Sports & Entertainment, said the team’s new season ticket card will allow for fee-free forwarding of tickets to others – such as clients or people who share seasons tickets – as well as printing of tickets at home.

"The Winnipeg Jets' mandate is to lead the league in fan-based efficiencies," Ludlow said, noting seven or eight other NHL teams have gone the same route this season.

There will be a fee, however, if fans want physical "spitter stock" tickets, the basic blue tickets featuring the game information. Ludlow said the team would charge $60 for this service the 2012-13 season.

The full-colour game tickets that were sent out to season ticket holders last year, however, no longer exist.

Ludlow said he understands memorabilia collectors may be interested in these ducats – there was a brisk business framing them last year – but there are no plans to print them.

"To the extent the demand is overwhelming, you’d have to react to that. We just don’t know," he said.

The season ticket card will also facilitate team loyalty programs in the near future, he said.

The cards, which should have arrived in every primary season ticket holders’ mailbox by the end of Tuesday, will be identified with the section, row and seat number associated with each ticket.

Putting a significant dent in ticket fraud is one of the driving forces of the new ticketing system, Ludlow said.