November 21, 2018

Winnipeg
-12° C, Overcast

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

No jail time for lawyer convicted on child-porn charges

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 31/3/2009 (3521 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

A former legal researcher with the Manitoba Court of Appeal who traded in child pornography and spoke of kidnapping and raping children will not go to jail, a Winnipeg judge ruled today.

Gary Dolovich was given a two year less-a-day conditional sentence, which allows him to remain free in the community. He was also placed on three years supervised probation.

Provincial court Judge Michel Chartier went along with a plea bargain that was struck by Dolovich’s lawyer, Josh Weinstein, and private lawyer Marty Minuk, who was hired by provincial justice officials to represent them to avoid a potential conflict of interest.

Minuk told provincial court during sentencing submissions last month that the joint-recommendation is on par with what others have received in similar cases in Manitoba prior to recently introduced, tougher penalties.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Join free for 30 days

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 31/3/2009 (3521 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

A former legal researcher with the Manitoba Court of Appeal who traded in child pornography and spoke of kidnapping and raping children will not go to jail, a Winnipeg judge ruled today.

Gary Dolovich was given a two year less-a-day conditional sentence, which allows him to remain free in the community. He was also placed on three years supervised probation.

Provincial court Judge Michel Chartier went along with a plea bargain that was struck by Dolovich’s lawyer, Josh Weinstein, and private lawyer Marty Minuk, who was hired by provincial justice officials to represent them to avoid a potential conflict of interest.

Minuk told provincial court during sentencing submissions last month that the joint-recommendation is on par with what others have received in similar cases in Manitoba prior to recently introduced, tougher penalties.

Dolovich would have been given a mandatory jail term under new federal legislation but is exempt because his crime pre-dates the changes.

Chartier had reserved his decision, saying he wanted more time to consider the case law.

Dolovich, 41, broke down in tears at his sentencing hearing and told court his addiction to child pornography led him to enter into a "sick world" that has ruined his life. He had previously pleaded guilty to possessing and distributing images of young children engaged in sex.

Dolovich was charged in July 2006 following an extensive police investigation that began in the fall of 2005. The case involved the search and seizure of several computers linked to Dolovich including ones used by the Court of Appeal. Police uncovered images on only his personal computer and found no evidence of crimes being committed at work.

Police said their investigation began with a tip from Australian authorities that a man was having conversations with several people over the internet and allegedly trading hundreds of child pornography images.

A forensic examination of Dolovich’s computers found that between May and September 2005, child pornography images were imported and distributed on 17 different occasions, according to investigators. A total of 547 images were found, most of them involving children between the ages of three and seven engaged in explicit sex acts.

Police also unearthed a series of online chats in which Dolovich discussed violently abusing the pictured children with other men he was trading images with.

In one conversation, Dolovich claims to know the kids in a certain picture and says he plans to "snatch them and rape them." He also claims he will abandon the children "in the middle of the province."

Dolovich was working at the time as a legal researcher with Manitoba’s highest court.

Dolovich was called to the bar in 1991 and worked briefly with the provincial government in its constitutional law branch, according to the Law Society of Manitoba. He first began working as a researcher with the Court of Appeal in 1995 but left three years later. He returned for a brief stint in 2001 and then again in 2004.

Dolovich’s employment with the Appeal Court was terminated weeks after his arrest.
 

Mike McIntyre

Mike McIntyre
Reporter

Mike McIntyre grew up wanting to be a professional wrestler. But when that dream fizzled, he put all his brawn into becoming a professional writer.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us