June 15, 2019

Winnipeg
19° C, Partly cloudy

Full Forecast

Politics 204 for October 9


Quote of the day

  • Syrian refugees at the Turkish border after escaping from intense fighting between Kurdish fighters and Islamic State militants. (CP)

    Syrian refugees at the Turkish border after escaping from intense fighting between Kurdish fighters and Islamic State militants.

    “Our government has adopted a generous approach to the admission of refugees while ensuring the selection of the most vulnerable people and keeping our country safe and secure, The audit we asked for earlier this year was to ensure that these policy objectives are being met.” — Prime Minister Stephen Harper responding to questions regarding reports the Prime Minister’s Office put a halt to the processing of UN-referred government-assisted refugees earlier this year. At the same time, a security audit was ordered of all Syrian refugees referred by the United Nations in 2014 and 2015.

Thanksgiving on the campaign trail

  • Conservative leader Stephen Harper waves to the crowd after addressing a gathering during an election campaign stop in Vancouver, B.C. (Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press)

    Conservative leader Stephen Harper waves to the crowd after addressing a gathering during an election campaign stop in Vancouver, B.C.

    Screening out: Accepting refugees for settlement in Canada should not be like a trip to the animal shelter — picking the cutest, healthiest pup for rescue. But a new federal screening process feels a lot like that, adding criteria such as the age of children and whether refugees have a business background into the consideration. That’s just wrong; After screening for potential security threat, Canada should take the most vulnerable, most at risk. That’s our Saturday editorial.
  • Platforms: The NDP and the Conservatives both released a costed platform today, following the Liberals who did so in late September. The Conservatives say their election promises will cost $6.8 billion over four years. Stephen Harper released his entire platform in Richmond, B.C. Tom Mulcair and the NDP released their platform in an event at the Montreal this morning as he desperately tries to turn things around for his party. The NDP had released a document outlining what the platform would cost in September but that document was devoid of some of the details of the plan. Meanwhile, Curtis Brown writes about the last days of Harper.
  • Southside scramble: Seniors, students and science are dominating the race in Winnipeg South, a suburban riding the Liberals are desperate to win after several tries and one the Tories are trying to hold. In many ways, it’s been a textbook race. It’s a quintessential battleground riding with a huge, much-coveted middle-class vote. It’s got two strong candidates, both with considerable ground games. There’s been some inevitable chatter over a Conservative candidate who sidestepped most debates and suffered a setback when an old anti-abortion video surfaced. And the outcome is anyone’s guess. Mary Agnes Welch takes us to Winnipeg South.

Local things to be thankful for

  • University of Manitoba Students' Union president Jeremiah Kopp (from left), Paul Soubry, campaign team president, Israel Idonije, U of M president David Barnard and Alumni Association president Kim Metcalf help kick off the university's $500-million Front and Centre campaign during halftime of the football game between the Blue Bombers and Edmonton Eskimos. (Trevor Hagan / Winnipeg Free Press files)

    University of Manitoba Students' Union president Jeremiah Kopp (from left), Paul Soubry, campaign team president, Israel Idonije, U of M president David Barnard and Alumni Association president Kim Metcalf help kick off the university's $500-million Front and Centre campaign during halftime of the football game between the Blue Bombers and Edmonton Eskimos.

    Front and centre: The University of Manitoba is grateful today after learning the province is kicking in $150-million for its $500-million Front and Centre capital campaign. The money will be spread over seven or eight years, and it would be the largest contribution ever made to a post-secondary capital project.
  • Handbill crackdown: Administration is directed to develop a plan to crack down on the proliferation of handbills. The Supreme Court has ruled municipalities can’t ban the placement of handbills, only regulate them. BIZ groups want city hall to follow examples of other communities where handbills aren’t an eyesore. Also, Coun. Jeff Browaty says it’s time for city to re-examine its support for the various community historical museums. Browaty said instead of having a dozen different, tiny museums spread across the city, perhaps their artifacts could be collected into a single location.

In case you missed it

  • Jeremiah Kopp, president of the University of Manitoba Student Union using a megaphone driving around with a cart is encouraging students to vote at the polling station at Pembina Hall Student Lounge on the campus. ( Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press)

    Jeremiah Kopp, president of the University of Manitoba Student Union using a megaphone driving around with a cart is encouraging students to vote at the polling station at Pembina Hall Student Lounge on the campus.

    Missing the point?: Has Conservative Leader Stephen Harper missed the point in this election? As Dan Lett writes, in his attempt to shore up the base, Harper may be shunning new supporters and that could mean a loss on Oct. 19.
  • Get out and vote: Jen Zoratti talks about getting out the youth vote in her column. It can be intimidating, but it’s important.
  • City matters: There’s a lot at stake for the city of Winnipeg in this federal election. For Mayor Brian Bowman, the focus needs to be on infrastructure spending for cash-strapped cities.

Today in history

  • In 1991, A crowd of 5,000 demonstrated at the Manitoba legislature demanding aid to grain farmers suffering from a global subsidy war. Mulroney government pledged $800 million the following day.

The Free Press Election Extra lets you know about everything that matters in 2018’s civic election. Receive it in your inbox three times a week until Election Day.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.