WINNIPEG - Five warming huts designed for people using the River Trail are now on the ice after spending the past week on display.

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This article was published 5/2/2010 (4278 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Tannis Broda and Josh Braaksma check out a warming hut called Apparition.

BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE

Tannis Broda and Josh Braaksma check out a warming hut called Apparition.

WINNIPEG - Five warming huts designed for people using the River Trail are now on the ice after spending the past week on display.

The Forks said the huts have been set up on the skating trail.

Skaters can cast their votes for which hut they consider to be the best by voting online at manitobahomecoming2010.com. A Homecoming spokeswoman said a link for the vote will be on the website by the end of the day.

Voting begins this weekend and runs until Feb. 15. The winning hut will be announced Feb. 16.

Officially called The Warming Hut: An Art + Architecture Exposition on Ice, the project gave each team $9,000 to a build snazzier version of the old wooden warming sheds, often called love shacks because of the shenanigans some skaters get up to inside.

The huts were to be placed between The Forks and the Manitoba Legislative Building:

  • Apparition: Antoine Predock, the architect behind the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, partnered with local landscape architecture firm Scatliff+Miller+Murray on the shelter looking like a cross between an igloo and crumpled aluminum foil. It has solar-fuelled lighting so the inside will have a warm, inviting glow.
     
  • CARCASS: Winnipeg-based Sputnik Architecture worked with artist Jon Pylypchuk on a hut inspired by decaying rural barns. It's made of wood, aluminum and polycarbonate and shaped like a lean-to with a rounded roof.
     
  • Ice Cube: Architect Kevin Loewen and photographer Merri-Lou Paterson built a cedar-clad cube with a rooftop solar panel to power interior lights. Because the interior is translucent, the cube will glow at night like a lantern.
     
  • Fir Hut: Architect Richard Kroeker and artist Neil Forrest used a wild mix of pop cans and balsam fir to create a modern thatched hut inspired by aboriginal design.
     
  • Sunspot: Artist Ewa Tarsia and 5468796 Architecture Inc. created a large orange orb that hangs the historic rail bridge. Its frame hovers just above the frozen river and was sprayed with orange water to form a thin shell of ice. Skaters have to shimmy into the orb from a hole near the ground, but once inside they're sheltered from the wind in a glowing ball.