Manitoba bars, restaurants hopping in February: survey

Advertisement

Advertise with us

Manitoba's food-services and drinking places were cooking in February, racking up the biggest sales increases in the country, Statistics Canada reported Monday.

Read this article for free:

or

Already have an account? Log in here »

To continue reading, please subscribe with this special offer:

All-Access Digital Subscription

$1.50 for 150 days*

  • Enjoy unlimited reading on winnipegfreepress.com
  • Read the E-Edition, our digital replica newspaper
  • Access News Break, our award-winning app
  • Play interactive puzzles
Continue

*Pay $1.50 for the first 22 weeks of your subscription. After 22 weeks, price increases to the regular rate of $19.00 per month. GST will be added to each payment. Subscription can be cancelled after the first 22 weeks.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 01/05/2012 (3865 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Manitoba’s food-services and drinking places were cooking in February, racking up the biggest sales increases in the country, Statistics Canada reported Monday.

The industry, which includes full-service and limited-service restaurants, bars and lounges and food-service contractors, caterers and mobile-food services, recorded a year-over-year sales increase of 12.1 per cent a month-over-month gain of 1.5 per cent.

StatsCan said February’s sales topped $129.5 million, versus $127.6 million in January and $115.5 million in February 2011.

Canada, by contrast, saw sales remain virtually unchanged from January to February — up 0.1 per cent to $4.3 billion. The year-over-year gain was 5.4 per cent.

The executive director of the Manitoba Restaurant and Food Services Association said the unseasonably warm weather in February and the return of the Winnipeg Jets were the most likely reasons for the surge in sales.

“It was great weather,” Scott Jocelyn said. “Our business is so dependent upon the weather…

“And there was also all of the excitement created by the hockey team,” he said, noting fans often went out to eat or drink before or after home games. If they didn’t have tickets, they went to bars and restaurants to mingle with other fans and watch the game on TV, he said.

— staff

Report Error Submit a Tip

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Business

LOAD MORE BUSINESS