Dairy facility to get $2.9-M upgrade

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The dairy operation at the University of Manitoba’s Glenlea Research Station will be undergoing a $2.9-million expansion and equipment upgrade.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 16/08/2017 (1827 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

The dairy operation at the University of Manitoba’s Glenlea Research Station will be undergoing a $2.9-million expansion and equipment upgrade.

The governments of Canada and Manitoba announced on Wednesday they’re investing more than $1.4 million to expand scientific research capacity at the research station’s dairy barn. The Dairy Farmers of Manitoba (DFM) is also contributing $1.5 million to the project.

The funding will allow the university to expand its dairy facility through a repurposed swine barn and to install a new automated milking system, free stalls for dairy cattle, dedicated spaces for calves, milk collection tanks, above-ground manure storage, new flooring and related laboratory equipment.

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Henry Holtmann, Dairy Farmers of Manitoba vice-chairman

“This investment enhances our researchers’ ability to develop holistic practices that will produce safe, affordable and healthy food for Canadians,” said Digvir Jayas, distinguished professor and vice-president (research and international) at the University of Manitoba. “It will also provide students with an outstanding hands-on learning experience in exceptional facilities,”

DFM vice-chairman Henry Holtmann noted the dairy barn is 50 years old and was in need of an upgrade.

“They’ve done a really good job with regards to animal care and working with what they have,” he said. “But universities need to look for capital from outside, and now we’ve finally provided the capital for their renewal.”

Holtmann said the project is expected to get underway in October and should be completed by March.

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