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Timeline of events in the deaths of three people in northern B.C.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 24/7/2019 (314 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Security camera images recorded in Saskatchewan of Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, are displayed during an RCMP news conference in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday July 23, 2019. RCMP say two British Columbia teenagers who were first thought to be missing are now considered suspects in the deaths of three people in northern B.C. The bodies of Australian Lucas Fowler, his girlfriend Chynna Deese, of Charlotte, N.C., and an unidentified man were found a few kilometres from the teens' burned-out vehicle. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Security camera images recorded in Saskatchewan of Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, are displayed during an RCMP news conference in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday July 23, 2019. RCMP say two British Columbia teenagers who were first thought to be missing are now considered suspects in the deaths of three people in northern B.C. The bodies of Australian Lucas Fowler, his girlfriend Chynna Deese, of Charlotte, N.C., and an unidentified man were found a few kilometres from the teens' burned-out vehicle. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

VANCOUVER - Three people are dead in northern B.C. and there is a major search stretching across Western Canada for two teens police say are suspects. Here's a timeline of events:

July 15 — The bodies of a man and a woman are found near a blue van on the Alaska Highway, also known as Highway 97, near Liard Hot Springs.

July 17 — RCMP say the deaths are suspicious.

July 18 — RCMP announce Australian Lucas Fowler, 23, and American Chynna Deese, 24, are victims of a double homicide. Meanwhile, in Jade City, B.C., Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, are spotted in a store where they stopped for free coffee. Jade City is about 350 kilometres from where the two bodies were found.

July 19 — Police announce the body of a man has been found two kilometres from a burned-out truck belonging to McLeod and Schmegelsky near Dease Lake, B.C. The two teens are missing. Dease Lake is about 470 kilometres from the first crime scene.

July 21 — McLeod and Schmegelsky are spotted in Meadow Lake, Sask.

July 22 — Mounties say Fowler and Deese were shot. They release composite sketches of a man seen speaking with the couple on the highway where they were found dead and a sketch of the unidentified man found dead near the burned truck. Fowler's father, an Australian police inspector, pleads for the public's help in the investigation.

July 23 — RCMP announce Schmegelsky and McLeod are now suspects in the three deaths. They release photos of the young men and a 2011 grey Toyota Rav 4 they may be driving. Fox Lake Cree Nation says a burned-out vehicle is found near Gillam in northern Manitoba. Police search that area.

July 24 — Manitoba RCMP confirm the burned-out vehicle near Gillam is the Toyota Rav 4 the suspects are believed to have been driving.

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