November 21, 2018

Winnipeg
-12° C, Overcast

Full Forecast

Uplift: Scare the pounds off

If you're like my family, last week, in anticipation of Halloween with costumed children coming up your front steps you went out and bought boxes of small chip bags, chocolate bars, and candy.

And, if you're like my family, you were left with a goodly portion of it when fewer children showed up than you expected. As well, if you have a child or two of Halloween age, you probably also have their bags filled with candy loot.

Jamie Lee Curtis in a scene from

Jamie Lee Curtis in a scene from "Halloween." Watching horror movies can help burn calories.

The only way to dispose of this candy is to eat it. Well, I suppose you could also take it to the office, but let's face it, likely your family will eat it. And by family, I mean you.

Thankfully there is a way of getting rid of any extra pounds you may gain because of this candy: Horror movies.

Yes, that's right you can drop the pounds and get a smaller waist line watching monsters attacking villagers or Jason in Friday the 13th movies prey on teenagers.

Doubt me? Well doubt no more. There is science backing this up - and an article about it here.

Researchers have looked into it and found that, on average, you can burn off 150 calories or more watching a horror movie for 90 minutes. That's the same number of calories you would lose if you went outside and walked for 30 minutes.

Even better, it's not like you have to sweat it out by being on a stationary bike or a Nordic Track ski machine while watching the movie to get its benefits -- you can lie back on your couch and feel the pounds coming off as you scream in terror.

Richard Mackenzie, a cell metabolism and physiology specialist at the University of Westminster, says it is because watching a scary movie gets the heart pumping faster, jump starts an adrenaline rush, and, in the end, burns a high level of calories. They tallied the results checking the oxygen intake, heart rate and carbon dioxide output of volunteers who watched the movies.

And what horror movie helps lose the most calories? The Shining starring Jack Nicholson helped burn 184 calories.

This was followed by Jaws, at 161 calories, The Exorcist, at 158, Alien, at 152, Saw, at 133, and A Nightmare on Elm Street at 118.

Of course, to get the best results there are a couple of rules. You have to keep watching the television screen and not hide your eyes, and you have to avoid distractions like checking texts or eating.

But that's easy, because it's a much more uplifting scare to find you're losing weight than the scare you get stepping on the scale.

– Kevin Rollason

kevin.rollason@freepress.mb.ca


One person can change life

  • Devon Clunis, former Winnipeg Chief of Police.  (MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>)

    Devon Clunis, former Winnipeg Chief of Police.

    Former Winnipeg police chief - and now children's author - Devon Clunis says sometimes it only takes one person to change your life.

    Clunis, who spoke recently at a fundraising breakfast for the Jubilee Fund, said that one person was his middle years teacher, Ruby Hanna, who helped tutor him after hours when he flunked out of Grade 6.

    "If not for one teacher, all those years ago, I would not be where I am today," Clunis said.

    Clunis said, just like that, each person at the breakfast could help citizens achieve a healthy future if they donated the Jubilee Fund, a registered charity which helps reduce poverty by financing projects that can't get loans at banks or credit unions.

Lovin' it working at McDonald's

  • Edward Case, an adult living with special needs, cleans tables and mops floors at the McDonald’s restaurant on Henderson Highway.

    Edward Case, an adult living with special needs, cleans tables and mops floors at the McDonald’s restaurant on Henderson Highway.

    Edward Case lives with special needs, but that doesn't mean he didn't want a job.

    Case, 40, who was volunteering at this year's McHappy Day, was spotted by a McDonald's owner who decided to offer him a chance for paid employment.

    Months later, Ryan McCullough, owner of 11 McDonald's in the city, is glad he did and now he and the organization that helps Case, Pulford Community Living Services, are working together to find other potential employees for him.

Local charity a top Canadian one

  • Jim Cornelius, Executive Director of the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

    Jim Cornelius, Executive Director of the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

    The Canadian Foodgrains Bank has been named one of the top 10 charities in Canada for social return on investment.

    Charity Intelligence Canada, which examines Canadian charities and reports their ratings based on impact per dollar of donation, published the list last week.

    The charity watchdog reported that while Canadian charities on average give $2 in social benefit for every dollar received, the Canadian Foodgrains Bank gives on average $6.

    "We have always been confident this work is reducing hunger in the world," said Foodgrains Bank executive director Jim Cornelius in a statement. "Being included in this list gives our supporters additional confidence that their investments in the Foodgrains Bank are truly having an impact."

Kroppy honoured

  • Len Kropioski’s hockey card.

    Len Kropioski’s hockey card.

    A special Remembrance Day trading card has been produced honouring a special fan of the Winnipeg Jets.

    Len Kropioski, known as Kroppy, was a veteran of the Second World War who, until he died in 2016 at 98, would regularly make the two-hour drive down the Trans-Canada Highway to take in a Jets game.

    Now Upper Deck's Museum Collection series, which honours one Canadian vet for Remembrance Day and one American vet for Veterans Day, has decided to showcase Kroppy as this year's Canadian card.

Honeymoon with the Jets

  • Honeymooners Ryan Bartlette and Ashley Bartlette in Helsinki, Finland.

    Honeymooners Ryan Bartlette and Ashley Bartlette in Helsinki, Finland.

    Ryan Bartlette may be a lifelong Winnipeg Jets fan, but his new bride, Ashley, has a get out of jail free card she can bring out anytime she wants.

    That's because Ashley allowed the man she married to detour part of their European honeymoon to Helsinki to catch a game between the Jets and the Florida Panthers.

    "I have a wife who is beautiful and smart and she realized that's a great card to have in her back pocket – 'remember that time we changed our honeymoon so you could go to a Jets game?'"

Not trick but treat: no child killed on Halloween

  • MPI says not a single child was killed in a motor vehicle collision while trick or treating in the last two years. (CP)

    MPI says not a single child was killed in a motor vehicle collision while trick or treating in the last two years.

    Ending with another post-Halloween article, Manitoba Public Insurance announced not a single child was killed in a motor vehicle collision while trick or treating.

    MPI said with so many children running around, looking for candy, not having any deaths both this year or the last decade shows zero fatalities can be achieved every day.

    "Years of enhanced public awareness about the increased risk to young pedestrians on Halloween, combined with safety tips to children and their parents, has resulted in a safety record that all Manitobans can be proud of," Satvir Jatana, MPI's vice president responsible for communications, said in a statement.

Your weekly squee

Ring-tailed lemurs carry their babies as they sit on a table of fruits at Bali Zoo to celebrate World Lemur Day in Bali, Indonesia.

Uplift is published weekly.

Want to receive this as an email?

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.