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Biodiesel mandate now in effect

Two per cent must come from crops

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An average of two per cent of all diesel fuel sold in Manitoba must now come from vegetable oils from canola, soybeans and sunflowers, Premier Greg Selinger said Monday.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 03/11/2009 (4669 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

An average of two per cent of all diesel fuel sold in Manitoba must now come from vegetable oils from canola, soybeans and sunflowers, Premier Greg Selinger said Monday.

The province’s new biodiesel mandate, the first of its kind in Canada, took effect Sunday.

Selinger said using more clean-burning biodiesel is expected to cut greenhouse gas emissions in the province by 56,000 tonnes a year or the equivalent of taking 11,000 cars off the road.

Biodiesel is a renewable fuel that can be produced from a variety of sources, including vegetable oils made from canola, soybeans and sunflowers.

The NDP promised in the 2007 provincial election campaign to implement a five per cent biodiesel mandate by 2010.

However, the province is now taking a gradual approach to ensure a smoother transition for the industry.

British Columbia is expected to introduce its own mandate effective Jan. 1. The Harper government has announced it plans to bring in a national mandate of at least two per cent by 2012.

The province will support the industry in the changeover by offering biodiesel producers a 14-cent-a-litre subsidy. The subsidy, which is to end in five years, will replace the government’s current fuel-tax exemption on biodiesel.

Mandating the use of biodiesel should not drive up fuel costs for farmers, truckers and others who burn diesel in Manitoba, since the cost of blending is low.

The biodiesel industry is expected to create a new market for Canadian farmers with oilseeds that fail to meet food-grade standards.

Biodiesel is now used in some vehicle fleets including those of Manitoba Hydro, the Winnipeg School Division and Canada Safeway. It’s expected to be available to the public next summer.

— Staff

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