City studies use of electronic billboards

Advertisement

Advertise with us

BY January 2012, city hall will develop a plan to end the widespread conflict over electronic billboards, which are popular among advertisers but increasingly despised by residents.

Read this article for free:

or

Already have an account? Log in here »

To continue reading, please subscribe with this special offer:

All-Access Digital Subscription

$1.50 for 150 days*

  • Enjoy unlimited reading on winnipegfreepress.com
  • Read the E-Edition, our digital replica newspaper
  • Access News Break, our award-winning app
  • Play interactive puzzles
Continue

*Pay $1.50 for the first 22 weeks of your subscription. After 22 weeks, price increases to the regular rate of $19.00 per month. GST will be added to each payment. Subscription can be cancelled after the first 22 weeks.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 06/07/2011 (4101 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

BY January 2012, city hall will develop a plan to end the widespread conflict over electronic billboards, which are popular among advertisers but increasingly despised by residents.

Council’s property committee voted Tuesday to give city staff six months to review electronic-billboard regulations across North America and recommend changes to the regulations governing the signs in Winnipeg. Committee chairman Jeff Browaty (North Kildonan) made the motion.

Right now, electronic-message centres that advertise products or services offered at the location in question may be granted permits. But billboards that carry third-party advertisements are not allowed downtown — except at media outlets and major sporting venues — and are subject to public hearings elsewhere in the city.

The inconsistencies have led to complaints from outdoor sign companies and residents alike.

Report Error Submit a Tip

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Local

LOAD MORE LOCAL