July 21, 2019

Winnipeg
14° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

City trying to deal with issue of illegal student housing around U of M

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 25/6/2015 (1486 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

City officials are trying to come to grips with problems posed by private homes illegally converted to post-secondary student housing.

Prompted by concern from residents near the University of Manitoba, the city’s planning department prepared a detailed analysis of how other municipalities deal with problems associated with student housing.

The Fort Richmond residents had complained about a proliferation of illegal rooming houses sprouting up around the U of M campus, poorly maintained yards, parking issues, noise complaints and overcrowding conditions that breach fire codes and pose a safety threat.

“It’s only a matter of time before someone, or maybe five or six people, die in a fire in one these homes,” said St. Norbert Coun. Janice Lukes, whose ward encompasses the area surrounding the U of M campus.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Keep reading free:

Already have an account? Log in here »

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 25/6/2015 (1486 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

City officials are trying to come to grips with problems posed by private homes illegally converted to post-secondary student housing.

Prompted by concern from residents near the University of Manitoba, the city’s planning department prepared a detailed analysis of how other municipalities deal with problems associated with student housing.

The Fort Richmond residents had complained about a proliferation of illegal rooming houses sprouting up around the U of M campus, poorly maintained yards, parking issues, noise complaints and overcrowding conditions that breach fire codes and pose a safety threat.

"It’s only a matter of time before someone, or maybe five or six people, die in a fire in one these homes," said St. Norbert Coun. Janice Lukes, whose ward encompasses the area surrounding the U of M campus.

Lukes said out-of-town landlords are buying single-family homes and illegally renting them to students. She said the problem has spread beyond the immediate neighbourhoods of Fort Richmond and University Heights, into neighbouring areas including Waverley Heights, Fairfield Park and Bridgwater Forest.

"Almost every street (in those neighbourhoods) has an illegal rooming house on it," Lukes said.

By law, only two unrelated people can live together in a home but Lukes said landlords are illegally renting out homes to as many as six to eight students.

Neighbours are annoyed because the rental properties are unkempt and there are problems with noisy parties. But Lukes said there are real safety concerns: lack of smoke and fire alarms, no fire extinguishers, inadequate number of exists; illegally converted space into bedrooms.

Lukes said the city’s bylaw enforcement officers act on complaints but it’s difficult to gain access to properties. She said officials evicted students from two illegal rooming houses this past spring.

The administrative report to Friday’s property and development committee doesn’t propose any solution and there is no recommendation for a next step beyond assessing the current situation.

Committee chairman Coun. John Orlikow said he hopes the committee can develop a plan on how to take the next steps to deal with the issue.

Lukes said as a first step, she will ask the committee to see how fire officials and bylaw officers can work more closely together

Other communities have tackled the problem, Lukes said, adding Winnipeg may have to devise special zoning regulations that recognize student housing but place limits on the number in each neighbourhood.

Lukes said she’s planning an open house in September to present a range of options for residents to consider but added she won’t impose a solution on them.

"The community has to take ownership and make a decision," Lukes said.

Here's a copy of the student housing report that will be presented at Friday's committee meeting.

aldo.santin@freepress.mb.ca

Aldo Santin

Aldo Santin
Reporter

Aldo Santin is a veteran newspaper reporter who first carried a pen and notepad in 1978 and joined the Winnipeg Free Press in 1986, where he has covered a variety of beats and specialty areas including education, aboriginal issues, urban and downtown development. Santin has been covering city hall since 2013.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

History

Updated on Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 2:17 PM CDT: Corrects reference to adjoining neighbourhoods.

3:48 PM: Tweaks headline, neighbourhood references.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us