November 15, 2018

Winnipeg
-4° C, Light snow

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Liberals only gainers in latest poll numbers

Trudeau’s popularity may be reason

Rana Bokhari

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Rana Bokhari

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 9/10/2014 (1498 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

MANITOBA’S Liberals have gained the most in provincial politicalparty support, says a new Probe Research poll conducted for the Winnipeg Free Press and CTV Winnipeg.

And it could have less to do with what voters think of Manitoba Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari than they do of Justin Trudeau, the popular leader of the federal Liberals.

The provincial Liberals gained four points from Probe’s last sounding of provincial support, while both the Progressive Conservatives and NDP dropped slightly, Probe Research president Scott MacKay said. “It seems that any kind of momentum either for the Tories going up and the NDP dropping doesn’t seem to be at play anymore. It seems things have levelled off now. The only dynamism or volatility is with the Liberals.”

The PCs under Leader Brian Pallister continue to enjoy a comfortable lead over the governing NDP with the support of 42 per cent of decided voters, down three per cent from 45 per cent in June.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Join free for 30 days

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 9/10/2014 (1498 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

MANITOBA’S Liberals have gained the most in provincial politicalparty support, says a new Probe Research poll conducted for the Winnipeg Free Press and CTV Winnipeg.

And it could have less to do with what voters think of Manitoba Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari than they do of Justin Trudeau, the popular leader of the federal Liberals.

The provincial Liberals gained four points from Probe’s last sounding of provincial support, while both the Progressive Conservatives and NDP dropped slightly, Probe Research president Scott MacKay said. "It seems that any kind of momentum either for the Tories going up and the NDP dropping doesn’t seem to be at play anymore. It seems things have levelled off now. The only dynamism or volatility is with the Liberals."

The PCs under Leader Brian Pallister continue to enjoy a comfortable lead over the governing NDP with the support of 42 per cent of decided voters, down three per cent from 45 per cent in June.

The NDP is also down slightly to 30 per cent of support from decided voters from 32 per cent four months ago. The decline in support for the two parties is within the poll’s margin of error.

MacKay said it appears the Liberals have taken advantage of that decline despite Bokhari’s low profile since becoming leader one year ago.

"It’s not that the Liberals have done anything at all," he said. "It’s just when a disgruntled New Democrat is looking for a home, there’s too much ideological difference between them and the Tories. They have to find somewhere to go, and they have to say something to a pollster on the telephone. They can’t bring themselves to be a Tory just yet."

MacKay said the other influence on provincial Liberal support is Trudeau, whose popularity has helped his party surge over Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservatives.

"The Liberal brand in Canada is pretty powerful these days," he said. "A few of those points in Liberal support you could give to that."

He said the challenge for the Liberals is to sustain and build on that support, something they haven’t been able to do since they were last in opposition under former leader Sharon Carstairs in the late 1980s.

MacKay said if the Liberals can maintain that 20 per cent support going into the next election campaign, likely in the spring of 2016, it can split the NDP’s vote and give the inside edge to the PCs to steal seats.

"At 20 per cent, it’s just dangerous enough to the NDP to wreck them and a bunch of seats cascade away from them," he said. "The Liberals may risk blowing this if they don’t do something soon."

The 12-point advantage the PCs have over the NDP is based on their commanding support outside Winnipeg, the survey says. On the other side of the Perimeter Highway, the Tories have 53 per cent support, up one point since June, while the NDP and Liberals are statistically tied. Nineteen per cent of decided voters would cast a ballot for a Liberal candidate, up four points from June, while 18 per cent would vote NDP, down seven points.

In vote-rich Winnipeg, it’s a different picture, as the two main parties are statistically tied for support.

The poll found 38 per cent of those questioned would vote NDP, up two points from June. While the increase is within the poll’s margin of error, it could be due to voters paying more attention to the NDP’s almost relentless media campaign on how it’s spending more money on roads and schools from last year’s increase to the provincial sales tax.

However, the NDP campaign was dulled as the survey period coincided with news Manitoba Hydro’s Bipole III transmission line had ballooned to $4.6 billion from a 2011 estimate of $3.3 billion and a national study that showed Winnipeg had the longest ER waits in Canada.

"Most of this poll and this measurement of opinion occurred at a time when there were almost daily announcements of bad things for the NDP," MacKay said.

For the Tories, the poll found they’ve taken a six-point dip in support in Winnipeg from June, with 35 per cent of respondents saying they will vote for a PC candidate.

"Their numbers are just going flat," MacKay said.

The Liberals saw their support in Winnipeg rise to 21 per cent from 17 per cent in June.

Broken down by region in Winnipeg, the Tories are seeing support in south Winnipeg, while the NDP holds onto the core and the northeast.

MacKay cautioned the sampling sizes in the city’s regions are small and not reliable.

The poll also found the Conservatives are also picking up more support among women, in recent times stronger supporters of the NDP.

 

bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us