Manitobans from all walks of life strongly oppose the Liberal-NDP coalition to topple the Harper government, a new poll has found.

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This article was published 4/12/2008 (4745 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Manitobans from all walks of life strongly oppose the Liberal-NDP coalition to topple the Harper government, a new poll has found.

In a telephone survey of 300 people taken earlier this week, the Probe Research poll found that 63 per cent of Manitobans strongly or moderately oppose the coalition.

The poll found that a clear majority of Manitobans -- 55 per cent -- strongly oppose the coalition, and 8 per cent are moderately opposed.

The poll found that 26 per cent of Manitobans strongly or moderately support the coalition, with 13 per cent strongly in support, and 13 per cent moderately in support.

There were 11 per cent undecided.

Scott MacKay, president of Probe Research, said the findings aren't surprising.

"Six weeks ago, 49 per cent of Manitoba voted Tory so you have to assume want what they voted for," MacKay said, adding that the remaining 14 per cent appears to come from a combination of individuals strongly opposed to "separatists" and "socialists," as the NDP are sometimes derisively labelled.

The poll is considered accurate to within 5.7 per cent, 19 times out of 20. It was conducted between Dec. 2 and Dec. 4.

Probe found that the coalition was rejected by Manitobans from all walks of life but support was substantially stronger than average among college and university graduates (38%, compared to 18 per cent support among those with Grade 12 or less), men (32% compared to 21% support for women), and Winnipeg residents (30%, compared to 22% support in the rest of the province).

MacKay said he couldn't explain the stronger level of support for the coalition from those who have completed post-secondary education, but added that support in that category is still dwarfed by those opposed to the coalition.