July 17, 2019

Winnipeg
20° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Sunday driving limitations on Wellington Crescent ignored by some motorists

Roberta Stout, second from right, signals to oncoming traffic while walking with her friend, Lorena Fontaine, and each of their daughters, Miya Wata, 9 (left) and Sarah Fontaine-Sinclair, 9. Traffic on Wellington Crescent is supposed to be limited to only one block on Sundays.

TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Roberta Stout, second from right, signals to oncoming traffic while walking with her friend, Lorena Fontaine, and each of their daughters, Miya Wata, 9 (left) and Sarah Fontaine-Sinclair, 9. Traffic on Wellington Crescent is supposed to be limited to only one block on Sundays.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 5/7/2015 (1473 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

On Sunday on Wellington Crescent, the posted cautionary signs are small and the frustration is huge as violations by vehicles are continuing.

A bylaw implemented last summer allows police to ticket drivers on Wellington Crescent, which is closed to motor vehicle traffic on Sundays and statutory holidays between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Motorists can only proceed for one block on those days during those times.

Barricades, which used to block vehicle traffic, are no longer there due to cost-cutting measures by the city.

Joggers, cyclists, dog walkers, people pushing babies in strollers and children on scooters are surprised and scared by vehicles rolling up on them.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Keep reading free:

Already have an account? Log in here »

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 5/7/2015 (1473 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

On Sunday on Wellington Crescent, the posted cautionary signs are small and the frustration is huge as violations by vehicles are continuing.

A bylaw implemented last summer allows police to ticket drivers on Wellington Crescent, which is closed to motor vehicle traffic on Sundays and statutory holidays between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Motorists can only proceed for one block on those days during those times.

Barricades, which used to block vehicle traffic, are no longer there due to cost-cutting measures by the city.

Joggers, cyclists, dog walkers, people pushing babies in strollers and children on scooters are surprised and scared by vehicles rolling up on them.

"They used to put up barricades and now they just have the signs up and a lot of people don’t see the signs. They need the barricades as reminders," said Roberta Stout, walking with her daughter Miya Wata, 9, who was on a scooter. They were accompanied by Lorena Fontaine and her daughter Sarah Fontaine-Sinclair, 9, also on a scooter.

"We often take the girls scooting on Sunday so they can use the pavement. The scooters don’t work as well on the gravel (path on the boulevard) so these are great days to go up and down this street," Stout said. "But there are cars that come down and I try to say to the them, ‘the road is closed.’ Some people will stop and say they didn’t know that and thanks for telling me. They either don’t know or they don’t care."

Fontaine said some drivers aren't so appreciative of the reminders.

"I had one guy (in a truck) a couple of weeks ago give me the finger. That’s nice. We’re walking with kids, we’re supposed to be here and he’s not," Fontaine said. "It’s the ones that drive really fast that we’re worried about. There’s little kids on the road, there’s joggers and they (vehicles) just come barrelling down here."

Dave and Linda Winmill and their dog Mojo walk down Wellington every Sunday and have seen some appalling behaviour from drivers violating the bylaw.

"I saw one woman this morning, she was tearing down there (driving a vehicle) and she was on her phone as well. I tried to stop her but she looked at me and just kept going," Linda said. "Cars are just whizzing by, and going more than one block. Runners are hollaring at the cars, ‘Get off the road!’ The drivers, road rage can come into it. We’re afraid there’s going to be a confrontation."

The bylaw is in also effect on three other city streets — Lyndale Drive, Scotia Street, and Wolseley Avenue. Those, along with Wellington Crescent, are considered cycling paths from mid-May to mid-October.

On Sunday, during a 45-minute stretch, there were more than 10 vehicles driving the full length of Wellington Crescent with people hurrying out of the way on several occasions. Police were stopping a number of the motorists, who can receive fines of $90.22, but the vehicles kept coming.

Without the barricades, it’s clear the signs aren’t working.

"Are we not supposed to be driving here right now?" asked Thompson resident Andrew Cristo who pulled over to ask a reporter and photographer. He and his wife Brandi, who is eight months pregnant, had come to Winnipeg for the weekend to shop for baby items. Brandi, with GPS in hand, said they were trying to find the Nuburger restaurant and ended up on Wellington Crescent. The only signs they saw were the hand gestures of people using the crescent.

"The first thing we saw was a family of five on their bikes taking up the whole road so I was going slowly, then we heard yelling so I wondered what was going on," Andrew said. "We kept on driving and saw some other people. Someone else did one of these hands up, palms to the sky. So we figured we better ask someone what’s going on."

Andrew said he can think of an easy answer to the problem.

"Block off the road. That’s makes it pretty clear," he said.

At a meeting last month of the city’s public works committee, councillors voted unanimously in favour of bringing back the barricades. River Heights-Fort Garry Coun. John Orlikow and Daniel McIntyre Coun. Cindy Gilroy have voiced their approval of the motion to reinstate the barricades which must still be approved by council. A vote could take place next week.

ashley.prest@freepress.mb.ca

-with files from Aldo Santin and Kristin Annable.

Ashley Prest

Ashley Prest
Reporter

Ashley works the general assignment beat.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us