Special tours, an ice sculpture and an image projected on the dome of the Manitoba Legislature will mark the 100th anniversary of women getting the vote.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 8/1/2016 (1951 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Special tours, an ice sculpture and an image projected on the dome of the Manitoba Legislature will mark the 100th anniversary of women getting the vote.

The commemorations are in addition to a special exhibit at the Manitoba Archives which includes petitions, newspaper clippings and the legislation that gave all persons the right to vote in Manitoba in 1916, the first province to do so.

But, as Family Services Minister Kerri Irvin-Ross noted, not all women won the vote in 1916, and issues of gender equity remain.

"We need to acknowledge that it took a while to address and ensure indigenous women got the vote," said Irvin-Ross. She said much remains to be done to curb violence against indigenous women, boost the number of women on corporate boards and ensure pay equity.

Among the events planned by the province:

  • Special tours all year long of the Manitoba Legislature highlighting notable female firsts.
  • Special banners on the grounds, an ice sculpture as part of Festival du Voyageur in February and an image projected onto the dome.
  • A special lecture Jan. 13 on women in politics by University of Manitoba professor Andrea Rounce.

A gala is slated for Jan. 28 hosted by the Nellie McClung Foundation to hand out the first Nellie Awards. There are about 200 tickets of the 1,200 total left.