Men, women and children solemnly walked from the Union Centre to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights to honour workers who have been injured or killed on the job.

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This article was published 27/4/2012 (3339 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Men, women and children solemnly walked from the Union Centre to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights to honour workers who have been injured or killed on the job.

Marie Gravoso, 17, from the Maples Collegiate Amnesty International club, was asked to speak about this year’s SAFE Workers of Tomorrow Leaders’ Walk theme -- the connection between human rights and worker safety.

About 300 took part in the annual SAFE Workers of Tomorrow Leaders' Walk Friday to recognize and honour those workers who have been killed, made ill, or been injured on the job that started at the Union Centre to the Scotiabank Stage at The Forks to hear speakers. In centre, Wanda Leschyshyn with her grandchildren and (left) her son Jason on the walk to The Forks, Wanda's husband Al was killed last year at the Wuskwatim Dam work site.

About 300 took part in the annual SAFE Workers of Tomorrow Leaders' Walk Friday to recognize and honour those workers who have been killed, made ill, or been injured on the job that started at the Union Centre to the Scotiabank Stage at The Forks to hear speakers. In centre, Wanda Leschyshyn with her grandchildren and (left) her son Jason on the walk to The Forks, Wanda's husband Al was killed last year at the Wuskwatim Dam work site.

"There are many people who are dying and being injured because they don’t know they have the right to ask questions," said Gravoso.

The walk is the largest Day of Mourning event in Manitoba. About 300 people, including 170 students, took part this year. They did so to remind us not only of those who’ve died or been injured on the job, but also of the work that still needs to be done.

People need to realize injuries are not inevitable, the walkers stated.

Marie Gravoso, Maples Collegiate student and member of the  Maples Amnesty Group speaks at event at The Forks.

WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Marie Gravoso, Maples Collegiate student and member of the Maples Amnesty Group speaks at event at The Forks.