May 31, 2020

Winnipeg
12° C, Mainly clear

Full Forecast

Help us deliver reliable news during this pandemic.

We are working tirelessly to bring you trusted information about COVID-19. Support our efforts by subscribing today.

No Thanks Subscribe

Already a subscriber?

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Visiting Rosser, Scheer tells Trudeau to 'step aside'

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 8/3/2019 (449 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

ROSSER — Federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer kept the heat turned way up on Justin Trudeau during a visit to Manitoba Friday.

"The role of prime minister is bigger than any one person, and if he truly had respect for the country, he would do the right thing and step aside," Scheer said while making an early campaign stop at a farm just northwest of Winnipeg to talk about home heating costs.

Canadians aren’t scheduled to go to the polls until late October, so it may have seemed a bit early to be outlining election promises.

Scheer used the backdrop of a dairy farm in Rosser to deliver a promise to give taxpayers the same break on home heating and energy costs they now get on groceries and prescription medications. Both are categorized as necessities and aren’t subject to GST.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Federal Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer (right) with Gordon Grenkow on Grenkow's family farm near Winnipeg. </p>

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Federal Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer (right) with Gordon Grenkow on Grenkow's family farm near Winnipeg.

Home heating is just as much a necessity as food or prescriptions, he said, adding the plan would cost $1.6 billion in lost taxes, which will be accounted for when the Conservatives unveil budget plans during the campaign.

Scheer is also waging a daily war on Trudeau’s government, accused of political interference in a criminal case involving Quebec engineering giant SNC-Lavalin, which led to the recent resignations of two key cabinet members.

Scheer said his party has so far rejected the strategy of introducing a non-confidence motion in the House of Commons that could — with support from within the Liberal caucus or the NDP — trigger an immediate election.

"We’re still trying to use the parliamentary tools at our disposal to get to the bottom of this scandal and break through the coverup Justin Trudeau is engaged in," he said.

Scheer made it clear that discussions between the Prime Minister’s Office and then-attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould about using a deferred prosecution in the case aren’t the issue.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Tory leader Andrew Scheer speaks to the media about his plan to remove the GST from home heating and energy bills if his party is elected.</p>

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Tory leader Andrew Scheer speaks to the media about his plan to remove the GST from home heating and energy bills if his party is elected.

"It’s not about whether deferred prosecutions are legitimate, it’s about the fact that Justin Trudeau used his position of authority to intervene in a court case," he said Friday.

"That’s completely unacceptable. I can assure you, I would never interfere in a criminal court case. That’s the difference between Justin Trudeau and me."

The Opposition leader said the Conservatives will, instead, pursue other motions in an effort to hear testimony from Wilson-Raybould about her removal as attorney general and her decision to leave the federal cabinet.

"She has indicated she has important information, and Justin Trudeau has refused to lift the gag order on her," Scheer said.

Last week, Wilson-Raybould told the House of Commons justice committee she was pressured last fall by Trudeau, his senior staff, the country’s top civil servant and others to intervene to stop the criminal prosecution.

Trudeau has acknowledged "an erosion of trust" and put the controversy down to a breakdown in communications between his senior staff and the former attorney general. He has maintained his position that his government has done nothing illegal or unethical.

alexandra.paul@freepress.mb.ca

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Your support has enabled us to provide free access to stories about COVID-19 because we believe everyone deserves trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

Our readership has contributed additional funding to give Free Press online subscriptions to those that can’t afford one in these extraordinary times — giving new readers the opportunity to see beyond the headlines and connect with other stories about their community.

To those who have made donations, thank you.

To those able to give and share our journalism with others, please Pay it Forward.

The Free Press has shared COVID-19 stories free of charge because we believe everyone deserves access to trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

While we stand by this decision, it has undoubtedly affected our bottom line.

After nearly 150 years of reporting on our city, we don’t want to stop any time soon. With your support, we’ll be able to forge ahead with our journalistic mission.

If you believe in an independent, transparent, and democratic press, please consider subscribing today.

We understand that some readers cannot afford a subscription during these difficult times and invite them to apply for a free digital subscription through our Pay it Forward program.

History

Updated on Saturday, March 9, 2019 at 8:13 AM CST: Final

The Free Press would like to thank our readers for their patience while comments were not available on our site. We're continuing to work with our commenting software provider on issues with the platform. In the meantime, if you're not able to see comments after logging in to our site, please try refreshing the page.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us