Winnipeg broke record highs Thursday when temperatures soared to 34 C, topping a record set more than 90 years ago.

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This article was published 5/5/2016 (1961 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Winnipeg broke record highs Thursday when temperatures soared to 34 C, topping a record set more than 90 years ago.

Environment Canada confirmed the high as recorded at Richardson International Airport.

"It's 34 C at the airport. You are enjoying it, aren't you?" asked Jennifer Hay, a meteorologist with Environment Canada in Vancouver.

Before Thursday, the city's record high for this date was set back in 1926, with a reading of 31.7 C.

Similar readings in the 30s were recorded Thursday across southern Manitoba.

</p><p>Areas with restrictions in place are highlighted in red.</p>

Areas with restrictions in place are highlighted in red.

The province, meanwhile, issued wildfire season travel restrictions late Thursday afternoon, cancelling burning permits anywhere in the eastern, central or western areas of the province.

The province also prohibited motorized travel in the back country of southeastern Manitoba from noon to 7 p.m, which includes any ATV use. The boundary of the no-go area runs from provincial road 302 east to the Ontario border and from the U.S. border north to Lake Winnipeg and the Winnipeg River. It includes the Mars Hill Wildlife Management area.

Outside the prohibited zone, wildlife managers with the province's new Sustainable Development Department are repeating precautions issued every time there's a heat wave and a risk of wildfire.

ATV users are reminded to stay on clearly marked trails, and check around the engine and exhaust frequently and remove any debris. As an added measure, ATV owners are asked to ensure their spark arrestor mechanism is working and to carry a fire extinguisher, axe and shovel to put out any fires.

The province slapped restrictions on activities in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park and the Spruce Woods Provincial Forest. Camping is permitted only in developed campgrounds and launching and landing boats is restricted to developed shorelines. All back country travel and access to remote cottage areas must be approved by a travel permit issued at the discretion of local conservation officers.

At Birds Hill Provincial Park, campfires are restricted to approved fire pits between the hours of of 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.

While the heat baked southern Manitoba, northern Manitoba saw wild fluctuations in temperatures. Places like Churchill were stuck at a high of -4 C, and to the west, locations like Flin Flon were a sunny 21 C. There was even a forecast of possible flurries in some remote northern locations overnight Friday.

Southern Manitoba will cool off by the weekend, with seasonal highs of about 19 C in cities like Winnipeg on Saturday and Sunday.

"There's a large area of high pressure in the southern prairies right now. You've had some southerly flow so the temperatures have come up. A lot of places in southern Manitoba, the temperatures have come up to the 30s," Hay, the Environment Canada meteorologist, said.

The current heat wave is the result of wind patterns in the upper atmosphere, called southerly flows. Waves like this often come ahead of low-pressure fronts that are moving into the region. Winds will shift to the north as the front approaches over the next few days.

For more information on fire and travel restrictions go to: www.gov.mb.ca/conservation/fire/Restrictions/index.html.

alexandra.paul@freepress.mb.ca