July 11, 2020

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Museum tour leaves visitors wanting more

'Just scratching the surface'

Visitors wait in the rain, with supplied umbrellas, for their preview tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. The rain kept away some of the people with reserved tickets, allowing walk-ups to gain access to the guided tour of four of 11 galleries. The rest of galleries open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Canadian Museum for Human Rights: Sneak peek at the galleries
Rain kept away some reserved ticket holders for free previews tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Frank Yong snaps a photo of his wife Teresa and her friend Jenny Lee, all from British Columbia, while they wait in the rain for their preview tour at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. The rain kept away some of the people with reserved tickets, allowing walk-ups to gain access to the guided tour of four of 11 galleries. The rest of galleries open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A preview group's first glance of the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Teresa Yong, who travelled from British Columbia, glances up at the dozens of alabaster ramps stacked throughout the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors take photos of the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27th. 140920 - Saturday, September 20, 2014 - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press) (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors stop to look at the first gallery Human Rights Over Time at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A couple on the walkway above the main entrance during the public's first look inside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Antoine Predock (right) the architect of the the Canadian Museum for Human Rights laughs with a volunteer on Saturday during free public previews. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors walk past the inverted woven basket in the Indigenous Perspectives gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors try out the lights of inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A group of visitors in front of a display on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the Protecting Rights gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A preview group walks up the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A young visitor enjoys the lights of inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at that the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27th. 140920 - Saturday, September 20, 2014 - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press) (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors file through the fourth gallery Protecting Rights at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors finish their preview tour in the Garden of Contemplation at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27th. 140920 - Saturday, September 20, 2014 - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press) (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
An image from Peace The Exhibition, from the Canadian War Museum.  (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation #2 - Indigenous Perspectives. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Gallery Installation #4 - Protecting Rights in Canada. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
 Installation # 1 - Human Rights Over Time. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Examining the Holocaust installation, with exhibits on death marches, genocide of groups and maps of Auschwitz, among others. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation #7 Breaking the Silence includes a study table. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation # 8 - Actions Count Gallery, which includes an interactive table.  (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation # 9 - RIghts Today. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
 Installation #10 - Inspiring Change. Museum goers will be asked to leave their comments of hope on 'I Imagine' cards and place them along a wall in the final installation.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors wait in the rain, with supplied umbrellas, for their preview tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. The rain kept away some of the people with reserved tickets, allowing walk-ups to gain access to the guided tour of four of 11 galleries. The rest of galleries open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Rain kept away some reserved ticket holders for free previews tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Frank Yong snaps a photo of his wife Teresa and her friend Jenny Lee, all from British Columbia, while they wait in the rain for their preview tour at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. The rain kept away some of the people with reserved tickets, allowing walk-ups to gain access to the guided tour of four of 11 galleries. The rest of galleries open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A preview group's first glance of the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Teresa Yong, who travelled from British Columbia, glances up at the dozens of alabaster ramps stacked throughout the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors take photos of the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27th. 140920 - Saturday, September 20, 2014 - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press) - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors stop to look at the first gallery Human Rights Over Time at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A couple on the walkway above the main entrance during the public's first look inside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Antoine Predock (right) the architect of the the Canadian Museum for Human Rights laughs with a volunteer on Saturday during free public previews. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors walk past the inverted woven basket in the Indigenous Perspectives gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors try out the lights of inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A group of visitors in front of a display on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the Protecting Rights gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A preview group walks up the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A young visitor enjoys the lights of inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at that the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27th. 140920 - Saturday, September 20, 2014 - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press) - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors file through the fourth gallery Protecting Rights at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors finish their preview tour in the Garden of Contemplation at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. That is only four of 11 galleries, the rest of which open September 27th. 140920 - Saturday, September 20, 2014 - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press) - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
An image from Peace The Exhibition, from the Canadian War Museum. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation #2 - Indigenous Perspectives. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Gallery Installation #4 - Protecting Rights in Canada. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation # 1 - Human Rights Over Time. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Examining the Holocaust installation, with exhibits on death marches, genocide of groups and maps of Auschwitz, among others. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation #7 Breaking the Silence includes a study table. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation # 8 - Actions Count Gallery, which includes an interactive table. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation # 9 - RIghts Today. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Installation #10 - Inspiring Change. Museum goers will be asked to leave their comments of hope on 'I Imagine' cards and place them along a wall in the final installation. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 20/9/2014 (2121 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

When a Via Rail train from Toronto pulled into Winnipeg Saturday morning for a short stopover, tourists on board from Venezuela hoofed it over to the weirdly beautiful building near the station.

"We saw it out the window," said Angel Hualde, 28, who was taking photos of his parents and sister in front of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights where people with passes for a free preview tour were lined up.

"We wanted to know what it is," the Venezuelan said before returning to the train for the journey to Vancouver. "It is very nice," just judging from outward appearances, he said.

Inside, it got favourable reviews, too, from the first of 9,000 visitors this weekend who got a preview tour of the CMHR. Although most had one complaint about the experience.

It was too short.

Guests try out the Lights of Inclusion game in the CMHR's Canadian Journeys gallery Saturday.

MELISSA TAIT / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Guests try out the Lights of Inclusion game in the CMHR's Canadian Journeys gallery Saturday.

"It was a brief tour -- just scratching the surface," said Maureen Polischuk. The sneak peek inside the new museum was limited to four of the 11 galleries. The tour was free but just 60 minutes long. When it's open to the public, people can pay $15 per adult and stay all day.

"I think it's the kind of place where I'd want six hours," said Polischuk, a mother of four. She was there Saturday morning with her husband, their youngest child and her neighbour, Bernice Marmel.

"It's fabulous," said Marmel. "The potential for learning about human rights is enormous."

The preview tour left Adam Bernardo also wanting more.

"I'm really glad they built it in Winnipeg. I'm proud of it," said the young man of Filipino descent.

"I've been to museums around the world and I think it's comparable," said Bernardo, who plans to return once the building is open to the general public Sept. 27.

A small group of pro-life protestors gather outside the CMHR Saturday while hundreds of people make their way into the CMHR for a free tour of the first four installations.

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

A small group of pro-life protestors gather outside the CMHR Saturday while hundreds of people make their way into the CMHR for a free tour of the first four installations.

"It reminds me of the Guggenheim," he said.

Winnipeg high school teachers Erin Ward and Peiki Loay, waiting for their morning tour to begin, said they were eager to see the much-talked-about and looked-at CMHR for themselves and their students.

"It's the first national museum outside of Ottawa. I wanted to see what it's going to look like inside," said Ward.

"I camped out in front of my computer to get tickets," said Loay. "I'm really interested to see how kids might be engaged with things."

She had heard the museum explores how human rights came to be -- something her students and most people need to know, she said.

"I think history is important -- if you understand what happened in the past you have a better orientation for the future," said Loay.

carol.sanders@freepress.mb.ca

Carol Sanders

Carol Sanders
Reporter

Carol Sanders’ reporting on newcomers to Canada has made international headlines, earned national recognition but most importantly it’s shared the local stories of the growing diversity of people calling Manitoba home.

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Buffy Sainte-Marie performs on the mainstage during RightsFest. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
RightsFest kicks off
Photos by: Ruth Bonneville, Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press
Bruce Cockburn performs on the mainstage during RightsFest at The Forks Saturday night.    (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Bruce Cockburn performs on the main stage during the RightsFest at the Forks Saturday night.    (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Buffy Sainte-Marie performs on the mainstage during RightsFest. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A red dress, one of many created to remember all of the missing and murdered women in Manitoba, is set on the stage behind Buffy-Sainte Marie as she performs. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Buffy Sainte-Marie performs on the mainstage during RightsFest at The Forks Saturday night.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Five-year-old Alina Weins giggles with her grandmother, Kathy Redekopp, while watching performers on the mainstage. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Fans of Buffy Sainte-Marie applaud as she performs on the mainstage during RightsFest Saturday night. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Shad performs on the mainstage during RightsFest at The Forks Saturday night.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Lineups of people gather in front of the CMHR for a free tour Saturday.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Rain kept away some reserved ticket holders for free previews tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Lineups of people gather in front of the CMHR for a free tour Saturday.    (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A small group of anti-abortion protestors gather outside of the museum Saturday while hundreds of people make their way in for a free tour. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Crowds begin to gather to watch and applaud for the Bros. Landreth as the band performs on the mainstage at the Forks Saturday during RightsFest. They were the first band to take the stage due to the rain earlier in the day. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Joey Landreth, lead singer of the band the Bros. Landreth, performs on the mainstage Saturday afternoon during RightsFest at The Forks. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
One-and-a-half-year-old Quinn Kolisnyk plays in a puddle next to the mainstage at The Forks with his green boots and yellow rain suit while waiting with his family for the band to arrive onstage. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors file through the fourth gallery, Protecting Rights, at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four-gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. The rest of the museum's 11 galleries are to open Sept. 27. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors finish their preview tour in the Garden of Contemplation at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors wait in the rain, with supplied umbrellas, for their preview tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A couple stands on the walkway above the main entrance during the public's first look inside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A preview group walks up the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Volunteers test out the Lights of Inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A young visitor enjoys the Lights of Inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at that the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors try out the Lights of Inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A group of visitors checks out a display on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the Protecting Rights gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors take photos of back-lit alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Antoine Predock (right) the architect of the the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, laughs with a volunteer on Saturday during free public tours of the building. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Antoine Predock, the architect of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, snaps a photo during public preview tours on Saturday.  (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Bruce Cockburn performs on The Forks' mainstage Saturday night during RightsFest, a concert celebrating the opening of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Buffy Sainte-Marie performs on the mainstage during RightsFest. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Bruce Cockburn performs on the mainstage during RightsFest at The Forks Saturday night. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Bruce Cockburn performs on the main stage during the RightsFest at the Forks Saturday night. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Buffy Sainte-Marie performs on the mainstage during RightsFest. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A red dress, one of many created to remember all of the missing and murdered women in Manitoba, is set on the stage behind Buffy-Sainte Marie as she performs. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Buffy Sainte-Marie performs on the mainstage during RightsFest at The Forks Saturday night. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Five-year-old Alina Weins giggles with her grandmother, Kathy Redekopp, while watching performers on the mainstage. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Fans of Buffy Sainte-Marie applaud as she performs on the mainstage during RightsFest Saturday night. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Shad performs on the mainstage during RightsFest at The Forks Saturday night. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Lineups of people gather in front of the CMHR for a free tour Saturday. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Rain kept away some reserved ticket holders for free previews tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Lineups of people gather in front of the CMHR for a free tour Saturday. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A small group of anti-abortion protestors gather outside of the museum Saturday while hundreds of people make their way in for a free tour. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Crowds begin to gather to watch and applaud for the Bros. Landreth as the band performs on the mainstage at the Forks Saturday during RightsFest. They were the first band to take the stage due to the rain earlier in the day. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Joey Landreth, lead singer of the band the Bros. Landreth, performs on the mainstage Saturday afternoon during RightsFest at The Forks. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
One-and-a-half-year-old Quinn Kolisnyk plays in a puddle next to the mainstage at The Forks with his green boots and yellow rain suit while waiting with his family for the band to arrive onstage. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors file through the fourth gallery, Protecting Rights, at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. Thousands had reserved tickets for the four-gallery preview tour on Saturday and Sunday. The rest of the museum's 11 galleries are to open Sept. 27. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors finish their preview tour in the Garden of Contemplation at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors wait in the rain, with supplied umbrellas, for their preview tours at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A couple stands on the walkway above the main entrance during the public's first look inside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A preview group walks up the alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Volunteers test out the Lights of Inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A young visitor enjoys the Lights of Inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at that the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors try out the Lights of Inclusion game in the Canadian Journeys gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
A group of visitors checks out a display on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the Protecting Rights gallery at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Visitors take photos of back-lit alabaster ramps between galleries at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Antoine Predock (right) the architect of the the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, laughs with a volunteer on Saturday during free public tours of the building. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Antoine Predock, the architect of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, snaps a photo during public preview tours on Saturday. - (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
Bruce Cockburn performs on The Forks' mainstage Saturday night during RightsFest, a concert celebrating the opening of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)

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