July 22, 2019

Winnipeg
18° C, Clear

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Kelvin kicks campaign into gear

Wants to raise $1M for new fitness centre

An artist's rendition of one out of a possible 10 architectural designs at Kelvin High School.

ARTIST'S RENDERING

An artist's rendition of one out of a possible 10 architectural designs at Kelvin High School.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 13/2/2015 (1620 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Every Manitoba school is great, Education Minister Peter Bjornson said Thursday -- but alumni and neighbours with deep pockets can fund a school to be better than great.

Kelvin High School in Crescentwood launched one of the most ambitious fundraising campaigns undertaken by a public school Thursday, hoping to raise $1 million by the end of next month to add a track and fitness centre to its new second gymnasium.

The province last year announced it would build a second gym at Kelvin, which had 1,336 students in grades 9 to 12 last year in Manitoba's fifth-largest school.

Bjornson denied Thursday the province is allowing affluent communities to enjoy school facilities that are better than some other neighbourhoods can afford to upgrade beyond provincial standards.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Keep reading free:

Already have an account? Log in here »

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 13/2/2015 (1620 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Every Manitoba school is great, Education Minister Peter Bjornson said Thursday — but alumni and neighbours with deep pockets can fund a school to be better than great.

Kelvin High School in Crescentwood launched one of the most ambitious fundraising campaigns undertaken by a public school Thursday, hoping to raise $1 million by the end of next month to add a track and fitness centre to its new second gymnasium.

The province last year announced it would build a second gym at Kelvin, which had 1,336 students in grades 9 to 12 last year in Manitoba's fifth-largest school.

Bjornson denied Thursday the province is allowing affluent communities to enjoy school facilities that are better than some other neighbourhoods can afford to upgrade beyond provincial standards.

"We've demonstrated we build great schools for all communities," Bjornson said. "Some communities have a greater capacity to expand the envelope, if they choose to do so."

'Some communities have a greater capacity to expand the envelope, if they choose to do so'

Kelvin is already 10 per cent of the way there, with Coun. John Orlikow (River Heights-Fort Garry) announcing a $100,000 municipal grant at Thursday's kickoff in the existing gym.

And MP Joyce Bateman (Winnipeg South Centre) said she's looking for some way the feds can put money into the project, even though she acknowledged in an interview she is unaware of federal grant programs for public schools.

"I've been appointed to the federal finance committee — I'm working on it," said an ebullient Bateman.

Kelvin vice-principal Joyce Wong said the enhancements would add 2,000 square feet to the new second gymnasium, which would be oval, and built either on the school's parking lot near Harrow Street, or on open land along Stafford Street adjacent to the football field.

The track would be built around the gym at floor level, with weights and fitness machines at either end.

The school will host an open house for residents Thursday, and meets with corporate alumni Feb. 25, Wong said.

"We have a sense of urgency" to get financial commitments, she said.

"We can't build on 'maybes,' " said principal Jim Brown. "The opportunities to make a real difference in this community do not come around often."

Said MLA Jon Gerrard (River Heights): "This is good for all of us. A high school is a tremendously good place to have an active living centre."

Orlikow emphasized the enlarged facility would provide recreational facilities neighbourhood seniors would especially embrace.

Wong, however, hedged when asked several times if Kelvin would charge area residents to use the new gym. "We're looking at partnering with the community," she said, but would not elaborate.

School board chairman and nearby resident Mark Wasyliw said the Winnipeg School Division wants to create a new public definition of what schools are, by transforming them into community hubs.

Mike Babinsky, trustee for Ward 8 in the central-north part of the division, noted that, "Some other schools would have problems" trying to raise the kind of money Kelvin wants.

But, he said, "I think the people of the North End would accept the challenge. A lot of well-to-do people came from struggling neighbourhoods — they'd go back and write a cheque," Babinsky said.

The other seven WSD trustees did not respond to interview requests.

Babinsky said it would be easier for schools in lower-income neighbourhoods to raise money privately if the province lifted its ban on selling naming rights, and if the division was not so averse to allowing advertising to accompany donations.

"I would favour that, yes, absolutely. It would have to be tasteful, it would have to be a very large sum of money," Babinsky said.

But Bjornson said the province won't budge. "Not at all — naming rights are not for sale," he said.

nick.martin@freepress.mb.ca

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us