August 20, 2019

Winnipeg
12° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Liberals silence debate on Air Canada bill

'Zero justification' for fast-tracking vote: Blaikie

SEAN KILPATRICK / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES</p><p>Winnipeg North MP and deputy House leader Kevin Lamoureux said there is a “finite” amount of time available to debate all the bills before the House of Commons, but the opposition isn’t being reasonable in negotiating debate time.</p>

SEAN KILPATRICK / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES

Winnipeg North MP and deputy House leader Kevin Lamoureux said there is a “finite” amount of time available to debate all the bills before the House of Commons, but the opposition isn’t being reasonable in negotiating debate time.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 17/5/2016 (1189 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

OTTAWA — The federal Liberals voted to cut off debate on legislation amending maintenance job requirements for Air Canada in three provinces Tuesday for the second time in less than a month, despite the express wishes of two provincial governments.

Bill C-10, which amends the Air Canada Public Participation Act, will go to a vote on third reading as early as Wednesday after the government introduced a time-allocation measure on it Tuesday.

The Liberals performed a similar manoeuvre last month to cut off debate at second reading.

Winnipeg North MP and deputy House leader Kevin Lamoureux said there is a “finite” amount of time available to debate all the bills before the House of Commons, but the opposition isn’t being reasonable in negotiating debate time.

Get the full story:

Already have an account? Log in here »

Keep reading free:

Already have an account? Log in here »

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 17/5/2016 (1189 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

OTTAWA — The federal Liberals voted to cut off debate on legislation amending maintenance job requirements for Air Canada in three provinces Tuesday for the second time in less than a month, despite the express wishes of two provincial governments.

Bill C-10, which amends the Air Canada Public Participation Act, will go to a vote on third reading as early as Wednesday after the government introduced a time-allocation measure on it Tuesday.

The Liberals performed a similar manoeuvre last month to cut off debate at second reading.

Winnipeg North MP and deputy House leader Kevin Lamoureux said there is a "finite" amount of time available to debate all the bills before the House of Commons, but the opposition isn’t being reasonable in negotiating debate time.

"Unless the opposition wants to work with the government in building a consensus and passing through in orderly fashion, then time allocation will have to be used," said Lamoureux. "The biggest concern has got to be the long-term best interests of the aerospace industry. It is believed this bill, if passed, will in fact, help the industry."

However, Elmwood-Transcona NDP MP Daniel Blaikie said the government has "zero justification" for fast-tracking the legislation.

The existing act requires the airline to keep "overhaul centres" in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Mississauga, Ont., but that hasn’t been the case since Aveos Fleet Performance went bankrupt four years ago. More than 2,600 people lost their jobs, including 400 in Winnipeg. Air Canada has done most of its heavy maintenance work outside the country since then.

Quebec sued, supported by Manitoba, and won in court. The decision was upheld on appeal.

Air Canada was taking the case to the Supreme Court, but that is on hold while it negotiates settlements with Manitoba and Quebec that include a "maintenance centre of excellence" in both provinces, as well as the purchase of new jets from Quebec’s Bombardier Inc. and the maintenance on those jets for up to 20 years.

Bill C-10 would amend the act to still require Air Canada to have maintenance jobs in Manitoba, Quebec and Ontario but gives the airline the freedom to decide what kind of jobs. If the amendment passes before Manitoba and Quebec settle with the airline, their bargaining power is limited because they will no longer have a case to sue.

Quebec asked the government not to enact the legislation until the legal case is concluded. Manitoba Justice Minister and deputy premier Heather Stefanson said Ottawa needs to at least hold off on the bill until Manitoba and Air Canada finish talks. She said she was disappointed the federal Liberals are pushing the bill through, and local MPs are helping.

"It’s unfortunate they chose not to stand up for Manitoba," she said.

Last week, Stefanson told the committee reviewing the bill her government does not support it because it doesn’t appear to provide a net gain to Manitoba in terms of jobs. Theoretically, Air Canada could meet its new obligation with a single maintenance worker in Winnipeg.

Lamoureux said just because there was a change in the Manitoba government (the Conservatives were sworn in May 3) shouldn’t mean Ottawa stops the process already underway.

"We had a responsibility to work with the government of the day when the government made the indication they were pulling out of the legal action against Air Canada," he told the Free Press in an interview. "Now that there is a change in government you can’t expect the new government to change all the rules of engagement that were there." 

mia.rabson@freepress.mb.ca

 

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us