October 22, 2018

Winnipeg
3° C, Partly cloudy

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Military expert says Kapyong could house refugees

The former Kapyong Barracks closed in June 2004.

BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

The former Kapyong Barracks closed in June 2004.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 5/11/2015 (1082 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

The Department of National Defence says it is working with federal departments to support Canada's objective of resettling thousands of Syrian refugees in Canada.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised during the election campaign to resettle 25,000 newcomers by the end of December.

A military consultant says Winnipeg has the perfect place to temporarily house 2,000 of them: Kapyong Barracks on Kenaston Boulevard.

"It's got everything," said Winnipeg's Gary Solar, chief of operations at the U.S.-based Center for Crime and Terrorism Studies.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 60 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Join free for 60 days

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 60 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 5/11/2015 (1082 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

The Department of National Defence says it is working with federal departments to support Canada's objective of resettling thousands of Syrian refugees in Canada.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised during the election campaign to resettle 25,000 newcomers by the end of December.

A military consultant says Winnipeg has the perfect place to temporarily house 2,000 of them: Kapyong Barracks on Kenaston Boulevard.

"It's got everything," said Winnipeg's Gary Solar, chief of operations at the U.S.-based Center for Crime and Terrorism Studies.

'It's got everything... It's a town in itself'— Gary Solar, chief of operations at the Center for Crime and Terrorism Studies, on Kapyong Barracks

The vacant military facility has living quarters, three mess halls for feeding people, recreation facilities and other buildings that could be used as classrooms.

"It's a town in itself," Solar said.

There's been speculation military planes could airlift large groups of Syrian refugees to Canada.

The military has said little about what, if any role, 17 Wing Winnipeg might have in welcoming refugees.

"While Citizenship and Immigration Canada remains the lead department on this matter, the Department of National Defence continues to work with other governmental partners toward supporting Canada's objectives," DND said in an email Wednesday. "Details remain to be determined."

Solar said 17 Wing and CFB Shilo, which is near Brandon, don't have room to shelter a large group of people, and Winnipeg armouries, such as the Minto Armoury, don't have appropriate facilities, he said.

With some political will and the human resources and reserves at the military's command, Kapyong Barracks could quickly be reopened as temporary housing to shelter Syrian refugees, he said.

"I don't think it would take too much."

The buildings and green space of the former barracks have sat empty for 11 years. The property was tied up in an eight-year legal battle with the federal government fighting Treaty 1 First Nations' right to be considered a potential future owner.

Now the federal government is talking with the First Nations about the property, but a final deal is a long way off.

In the meantime, Kapyong could provide shelter to refugees from Syria facing an uncertain future — as it likely could have provided shelter to hundreds of Interlake First Nations flood evacuees four years ago, Solar said.

Former defence chief of staff Rick Hillier said in a Facebook post Sept. 6 that Canada has a duty and the ability to help 50,000 refugees from Syria.

"I wonder why we, as the great country that we are, could not stand tall during these dark days for the hundreds of thousands of displaced souls who are fleeing, quite literally, for their very lives."

A lead minister, supported by the Royal Canadian Air Force, RCMP, Foreign Affairs and Finance departments could drive a mission "to bring 50,000 of those frightened men, women and children to Canada."

It may sound "implausible, but we Canadians are capable of doing the implausible when we believe it important enough," Hillier wrote.

carol.sanders@freepress.mb.ca

Carol Sanders

Carol Sanders
Reporter

Carol Sanders’ reporting on newcomers to Canada has made international headlines, earned national recognition but most importantly it’s shared the local stories of the growing diversity of people calling Manitoba home.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us