HISTORY will show the spring of 2010 was the warmest on record for Canada -- but Manitoba contributed absolutely nothing to those record-breaking statistics.

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This article was published 9/6/2010 (4156 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

HISTORY will show the spring of 2010 was the warmest on record for Canada -- but Manitoba contributed absolutely nothing to those record-breaking statistics.

The national average temperature was 4.1 C above normal for a three-month period, ending in May, according to an Environment Canada climatologist.

And that record-breaking spring came on the heels of the warmest winter since the agency began keeping records in 1948.

"I thought we'd never see a season like the winter, which was the warmest and driest," said David Phillips, a senior climatologist with Environment Canada.

Here in Manitoba, however, spring has been nothing to write home about. The average temperature for Winnipeg in May was 12.1 C, a less-than-scorching .1 C above the 30-year average.

While the mercury peaked at 29 C on May 19 and 20, cool temperatures at the beginning of the month and the monsoon-like weather at the end of the month helped keep temperatures down.

"You had your hot days, you had your cool days, so it pretty much just averaged out to your normal," said Environment Canada meteorogolist Greg Pearce.

But we did get drenched in May with 160 millimetres of rain -- up from an average of 58 mm.

Across the province, temperatures hovered around normal or dipped a degree or two, Pearce said. Brandon's average temperature dipped by about 1.5 C, and in Thompson by about one degree.

"Looks like Manitoba didn't luck out and get the warmth the rest of the country did," Pearce said.

Elsewhere in Canada, the spring temperatures were so high -- especially in the North -- Phillips said he expects to see a record retreat of the Arctic ice this summer.

"I would bet my pension that the Arctic ice will be the lowest ever this summer," he said.

"The ice doesn't have a chance," he added, noting how 24-hour sunshine will likely to make short work of the ice, which is unusually thin going into the summer.

Temperature records were shattered across the Canadian north, with temperatures more than six degrees higher in some Arctic areas in the last three months, says a climate bulletin posted on Environment Canada's website this week.

And 2010 is shaping up to be one of the warmest years ever globally, and will likely break the previous 1998 record in Canada.

Phillips said there is "no question" the Canadian climate is changing, as all seasons have shown a warming trend since 1948.

-- Winnipeg Free Press, Canwest News Service